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Transitions from Temporary to Permanent Work in Canada: Who Makes the Transition and Why?

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Author Info

  • Tony Fang

    ()

  • Fiona MacPhail

    ()

Abstract

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-007-9210-7
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

Volume (Year): 88 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 (August)
Pages: 51-74

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Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:88:y:2008:i:1:p:51-74

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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Related research

Keywords: Transition rates; Temporary; Permanent jobs; Labour market flexibility; Canada;

References

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Lewis M. Segal & Daniel G. Sullivan, 1997. "The Growth of Temporary Services Work," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 117-136, Spring.
  2. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones or Dead Ends?," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 8, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
  3. Sylvia Fuller & Leah Vosko, 2008. "Temporary Employment and Social Inequality in Canada: Exploring Intersections of Gender, Race and Immigration Status," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 88(1), pages 31-50, August.
  4. Jacqueline O'Reilly & Silke Bothfeld, 2002. "What happens after working part time? Integration, maintenance or exclusionary transitions in Britain and western Germany," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(4), pages 409-439, July.
  5. Alison L Booth & Juan J. Dolado & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Symposium On Temporary Work Introduction," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages F181-F188, June.
  6. Bertil Holmlund & Donald Storrie, 2002. "Temporary Work In Turbulent Times: The Swedish Experience," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages F245-F269, June.
  7. O Blanchard & A Landier, 2002. "The Perverse Effects of Partial Labour Market Reform: fixed--Term Contracts in France," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages F214-F244, June.
  8. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes, 2000. "Work transitions into and out of involuntary temporary employment in a segmented market: Evidence from Spain," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(2), pages 309-325, January.
  9. Gaston, Noel & Timcke, David, 1999. "Do Casual Workers Find Permanent Full-Time Employment? Evidence from the Australian Youth Survey," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 75(231), pages 333-47, December.
  10. Kapsalis, Constantine & Tourigny, Pierre, 2004. "Duration of Non-standard Employment," MPRA Paper 25795, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Rebecca M. Blank, 1994. "The Dynamics of Part-Time Work," NBER Working Papers 4911, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Jenny Chalmers & Guyonne Kalb, 2001. "Moving from Unemployment to Permanent Employment: Could a Casual Job Accelerate the Transition?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(4), pages 415-436.
  13. Fiona MacPhail & Paul Bowles, 2008. "Temporary work and neoliberal government policy: evidence from British Columbia, Canada," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(5), pages 545-563.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Fang, Tony & Samnani, Al-Karim & Novicevic, Milorad M. & Bing, Mark N., 2012. "Liability-of-Foreignness Effects on Job Success of Immigrant Job Seekers," IZA Discussion Papers 6742, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Danielle Venn, 2009. "Legislation, Collective Bargaining and Enforcement: Updating the OECD Employment Protection Indicators," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 89, OECD Publishing.

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