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Moving Forward in African Economic History: Bridging the Gap Between Methods and Sources

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Author Info

  • Jerven , Morten

    ()
    (School of International Studies, Simon Fraser University)

  • Austin , Gareth

    ()
    (Graduate Institute, Geneva)

  • Green, Erik

    ()
    (Department of Economic History, Lund University)

  • Uche , Chibuike

    ()
    (Department of Banking and Finance, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus)

  • Frankema , Ewout

    ()
    (Department of Social and Economic History, Utrecht University)

  • Fourie , Johan

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Stellenbosch University)

  • Inikori , Joseph

    ()
    (Department of History, University of Rochester)

  • Moradi , Alexander

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Sussex)

  • Hillbom , Ellen

    ()
    (Department of Economic History, Lund University)

Abstract

The field of African economic history is in resurgence. This paper reviews recent and on-going research contributions and notes strengths in their wide methodological, conceptual and topical variety. In these strengths there is also a challenge: different methodological approaches may also result in divisions, particularly on the quantitative versus qualitative axis. The African Economic History Network has recently been formed to bridge the gap between methods and sources and to facilitate intellectual exchanges among the widest possible range of scholars working on Sub-Saharan economic history. This paper outlines current research projects and calls for future research as well as suggesting promising lines of enquiry in the discipline.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by African Economic History Network in its series African Economic History Working Paper with number 1/2012.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 30 May 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:afekhi:2012_001

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Web page: http://www.aehnetwork.org/

Related research

Keywords: Africa; Economic History; Sources; Methods; GDP; population; agriculture;

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References

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