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Accident risk, gender, family status and occupational choice in the UK

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  • Grazier, S.
  • Sloane, P.J.

Abstract

Many studies show that women are more risk averse than men. In this paper, following DeLeire and Levy [Deleire T. and Levy H. (2004) 'Worker Sorting and the Risk of Death on the Job', Journal of Labor Economics, Vol. 22, No. 4, pp. 210-217.] for the US, we use family structure as a proxy for the degree of risk aversion to test the proposition that those with strong aversion to risk will make occupational choices biased towards safer jobs. In line with DeLeire and Levy we find that women are more risk averse than men and those that are single with children are more risk averse than those without. The effect on the degree of gender segregation is somewhat smaller than for the US.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Labour Economics.

Volume (Year): 15 (2008)
Issue (Month): 5 (October)
Pages: 938-957

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Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:15:y:2008:i:5:p:938-957

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco

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Keywords: Accident risk Gender segregation Family status Occupational choice;

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References

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  1. Dohmen, Thomas J & Falk, Armin & Huffman, David & Schupp, Jürgen & Sunde, Uwe & Wagner, Gert Georg, 2006. "Individual Risk Attitudes: New Evidence from a Large, Representative, Experimentally-Validated Survey," CEPR Discussion Papers 5517, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Poulsen, Anders & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2005. "Male and Female Competitive Behavior: Experimental Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 1833, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Peter J. Dolton & Michael P. Kidd, 1994. "Occupational Access And Wage Discrimination," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 56(4), pages 457-474, November.
  4. Hausman, Jerry & McFadden, Daniel, 1984. "Specification Tests for the Multinomial Logit Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(5), pages 1219-40, September.
  5. Xiangdong Wei & Steve Russell & Robert Sandy, 2005. "Analysing workplace safety policies in hong kong with a simulation method," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 321-353.
  6. Ekelund, Jesper & Johansson, Edvard & Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta & Lichtermann, Dirk, 2005. "Self-employment and risk aversion--evidence from psychological test data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(5), pages 649-659, October.
  7. Sandy, Robert & R. F. Elliot & W. S. Siebert & X. D. Wei, 2001. " Measurement Error and the Effects of Unions on the Compensating Differentials for Fatal Workplace Risks," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 33-56, July.
  8. Thomas DeLeire & Helen Levy, 2004. "Worker Sorting and the Risk of Death on the Job," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(4), pages 925-954, October.
  9. Sarah Brown, Karl Taylor & Karl Taylor, 2004. "Wage Growth, Human Capital And Risk Preference," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 131, Royal Economic Society.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Michelle Tan, 2009. "Noncognitive Skills, Occupational Attainment, and Relative Wages," CEPR Discussion Papers 612, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  2. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Theodossiou, Ioannis, 2010. "An Inquiry into the Theory, Causes and Consequences of Monitoring Indicators of Health and Safety at Work," IZA Discussion Papers 4734, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Antecol, Heather & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A., 2013. "Do psychosocial traits help explain gender segregation in young people's occupations?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 59-73.
  4. Wells, Robert, 2010. "An examination of the utility bearing characteristics of occupations: A factor analytical approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 108(3), pages 296-298, September.
  5. Nikolaos Georgantzis & Efi Vasileiou, 2012. "Are dangerous jobs paid better? European evidence," Working Papers 2012/18, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
  6. Nils Braakmann, 2013. "What Determines Wage Inequality Among Young German University Graduates?," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 233(2), pages 130-158, March.

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