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Do resource dependent regions grow slower than they should?

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Author Info

  • James, Alexander G.
  • James, Robert G.

Abstract

A large literature documents a negative correlation between income growth and resource dependence. This correlation has been named the resource curse. We present evidence that suggests that the resource curse can be explained by a slow growing resource sector.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 111 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 194-196

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:111:y:2011:i:3:p:194-196

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

Related research

Keywords: Resource dependence Economic growth Resource curse;

References

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  1. van Wijnbergen, Sweder J G, 1984. "The 'Dutch Disease': A Disease after All?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(373), pages 41-55, March.
  2. Kiminori Matsuyama, 1991. "Agricultural Productivity, Comparative Advantage and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 3606, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. James, Alex & Aadland, David, 2011. "The curse of natural resources: An empirical investigation of U.S. counties," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 440-453, May.
  4. repec:fth:stanho:e-92-3 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Sachs, J-D & Warner, A-M, 1995. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," Papers 517a, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
  6. Sachs, Jeffrey D. & Warner, Andrew M., 2001. "The curse of natural resources," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 827-838, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Libman, Alexander, 2013. "Natural resources and sub-national economic performance: Does sub-national democracy matter?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 82-99.
  2. Fleming, David A. & Measham, Thomas G., 2013. "Disentangling the Natural Resources Curse: National and Regional Socioeconomic Impacts of Resource Windfalls," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150526, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  3. Graham A. Davis, 2012. "Replicating "Sources of Slow Growth in African Economies"," Working Papers 2012-09, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
  4. Davis, Graham A. & Vásquez Cordano, Arturo L., 2013. "The fate of the poor in growing mineral and energy economies," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 138-151.

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