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Frequency of examinations and student achievement in a randomized experiment

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  • De Paola, Maria
  • Scoppa, Vincenzo

Abstract

We carry out a randomized experiment involving undergraduate students enrolled at an Italian University attending two introductory economics classes to evaluate the impact on achievement of examination frequency and interim feedback provision. Students in the treated group were allowed to undertake an intermediate exam and were informed about the results obtained, while students in the control group could only take the final exam. The results show that students undertaking the intermediate exam perform better both in terms of the probability of passing the exams and of grades obtained. High ability students appear to benefit more from the treatment. The experiment design allows us to disentangle “workload division or commitment” effects from “feedback provision” effects. We find that the estimated treatment impact is due exclusively to the first effect, while the feedback provision has no positive effect on performance. Finally, the better performance of treated students in targeted examinations seems not to be obtained at the expenses of results earned in other examinations.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 1416-1429

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:30:y:2011:i:6:p:1416-1429

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

Related research

Keywords: Frequency of examinations; Education production function; Work organization; Feedback provision; Higher education; Randomized evaluation;

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Cited by:
  1. Kooreman, Peter, 2013. "Rational students and resit exams," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(1), pages 213-215.
  2. Kooreman, Peter, 2012. "Rational Students and Resit Exams," IZA Discussion Papers 6832, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Antonello E. Scorcu & Laura Vici, 2013. "Economic and cultural factors and illegal copying in the university textbook market," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-01-2013, the Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Feb 2013.
  4. Onji, Kazuki, 2013. "Estimating the effects of procrastination on performance: A small sample study," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 85-90.
  5. De Paola, Maria & Gioia, Francesca & Scoppa, Vincenzo, 2013. "Are Females Scared of Competing with Males? Results from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 7799, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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