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Citations for "Simulation-based Inference in Dynamic Panel Probit Models: an Application to Health"

by Paul Contoyannis & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice

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  1. Paul Contoyannis & Andrew M. Jones & Roberto Leon-Gonzalez, 2004. "Using simulation-based inference with panel data in health economics," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(2), pages 101-122.
  2. Timothy J. Halliday, 2009. "Health Inequality over the Life-Cycle," Working Papers 2011-11R, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa, revised Jun 2011.
  3. Cristina Hernández-Quevedo & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice, 2007. "Persistence in health limitations: a European comparative analysis," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 07/03, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  4. Andrew M. Jones & Angel López Nicolás, 2004. "Measurement and explanation of socioeconomic inequality in health with longitudinal data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 1015-1030.
  5. Timothy J. Halliday, 2008. "Heterogeneity, state dependence and health," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 11(3), pages 499-516, November.
  6. Martin Biewen, 2004. "Measuring State Dependence in Individual Poverty Status: Are there Feedback Effects to Employment Decisions and Household Composition?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 429, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  7. Paul Contoyannis & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice, 2004. "The dynamics of health in the British Household Panel Survey," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(4), pages 473-503.
  8. Roy, John & Schurer, Stefanie, 2013. "Getting Stuck in the Blues: Persistence of Mental Health Problems in Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 7451, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Chalkley, Martin & Tilley, Colin & Rennie, J. S., 2008. "Recruitment and retention incentives in health labour markets: an analysis of participation in NHS Scotland following Dental Vocational," SIRE Discussion Papers 2008-47, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
  10. Cristina Hernández-Quevedo & Cristina Masseria, 2013. "Measuring income-related inequalities in health in multi-country analysis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 53576, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  11. Martin Chalkley & J. S. Rennie & Colin Tilley, 2008. "Recruitment and retention incentives in health labour markets: an analysis of participation in NHS Scotland following Dental Vocational Training," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 218, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
  12. Contoyannis, Paul & Li, Jinhu, 2011. "The evolution of health outcomes from childhood to adolescence," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 11-32, January.
  13. Sara Ayllón Gatnau, 2009. "Modelling state dependence and feedback effects between poverty, employment and parental home emancipation among European youth," Economics Working Papers 1180, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  14. Slade, Alexander N., 2012. "Health investment decisions in response to diabetes information in older Americans," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 502-520.
  15. Martin Biewen, 2009. "Measuring state dependence in individual poverty histories when there is feedback to employment status and household composition," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(7), pages 1095-1116.
  16. Ji-Liang Shiu & Yingyao Hu, 2010. "Identification and Estimation of Nonlinear Dynamic Panel Data Models with Unobserved Covariates," Economics Working Paper Archive 557, The Johns Hopkins University,Department of Economics.
  17. Narimasa Kumagai & Seiritsu Ogura, 2014. "Persistence of physical activity in middle age: a nonlinear dynamic panel approach," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(7), pages 717-735, September.
  18. Mª Luz González Alvarez & Antonio Clavero Barranquero, 2008. "An analysis of income-related inequalities in the health care use by dynamic models," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 186(3), pages 9-42, October.
  19. Florian Heiss, 2011. "Dynamics of self-rated health and selective mortality," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 119-140, February.
  20. Katharina Hauck & Nigel Rice, 2004. "A longitudinal analysis of mental health mobility in Britain," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 981-1001.
  21. Katharina Hauck & Aki Tsuchiya, 2010. "Health mobility: implications for efficiency and equity in priority setting," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 6/10, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
  22. Riccardo Lucchetti & Claudia Pigini, 2015. "DPB: Dynamic Panel Binary data models in Gretl," gretl working papers 1, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali, revised 24 Apr 2015.
  23. Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & Masseria, Cristina, 2013. "Measuring Income-Related Inequalities in Health in Multi-Country Analysis/Midiendo las desigualdades en salud relacionadas con la renta entre países," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 455-476, Septiembr.
  24. Whittaker, W & Sutton, M, 2010. "Mental health, work incapacity and State transfers: an analysis of the British Household Panel Survey," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/21, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  25. Ehsan Khoman & James Mitchell & Martin Weale, 2008. "Incidence-based estimates of life expectancy of the healthy for the UK: coherence between transition probabilities and aggregate life-tables," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 171(1), pages 203-222.
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