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Laboratory measure of cheating predicts school misconduct

Author

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  • Alain Cohn
  • Michel André Maréchal

Abstract

Laboratory experiments provide insights into the drivers of cheating behaviour, but it is unclear to what extent cheating in the lab generalizes to the field. We conducted an experiment with middle and high school students to test whether a common laboratory measure of cheating predicts three types of school misconduct: (i) disruptiveness in class, (ii) homework non-completion, and (iii) absenteeism. We find that students who cheat in the experimental task are more likely to misbehave at school, suggesting that experimental measures of cheating generalize to rule violating behaviour in naturally occurring environments.

Suggested Citation

  • Alain Cohn & Michel André Maréchal, 2015. "Laboratory measure of cheating predicts school misconduct," ECON - Working Papers 205, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Nov 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:zur:econwp:205
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fehr, Ernst & Leibbrandt, Andreas, 2011. "A field study on cooperativeness and impatience in the Tragedy of the Commons," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(9-10), pages 1144-1155, October.
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    1. repec:eee:joepsy:v:62:y:2017:i:c:p:258-267 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cheating; honesty; experiment; external validity; misconduct;

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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