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South-North convergence from a new perspective

  • Hübler, Michael

This North-South model of Schumpeterian endogenous growth combines a market, productivity and knowledge effect. A set of various convergent and divergent growth paths is derived that is much richer than in the literature so far. South-North convergence based on North-South technology diffusion through intermediate goods trade is guaranteed if the knowledge effect dominates the productivity effect. Moreover, a larger Southern market expands the area of convergence and can prevent divergence. Not only a larger Southern market size, but also a higher Southern steady state growth rate benefit the North so that convergence is desirable for both, the South and the North.

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Paper provided by ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research in its series ZEW Discussion Papers with number 13-104.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:13104
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  2. Zhiqi Chen, 1992. "Long-Run Equilibria in a Dynamic Heckscher-Ohlin Model," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 25(4), pages 923-43, November.
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  6. David Mayer-Foulkes & Peter Nunnenkamp, 2005. "Do Multinational Enterprises Contribute to Convergence or Divergence? A Disaggregated Analysis of US FDI," DEGIT Conference Papers c010_045, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
  7. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 2009. "The Economics of Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 9780262012638, June.
  8. Sourafel Girma, 2005. "Absorptive Capacity and Productivity Spillovers from FDI: A Threshold Regression Analysis," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 67(3), pages 281-306, 06.
  9. Rachel Griffith & Stephen Redding & John Van Reenen, 2004. "Mapping the Two Faces of R&D: Productivity Growth in a Panel of OECD Industries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(4), pages 883-895, November.
  10. Mountford, Andrew, 1998. "Trade, convergence and overtaking," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 167-182, October.
  11. Evans, Paul, 1996. "Using cross-country variances to evaluate growth theories," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(6-7), pages 1027-1049.
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