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Employment effects of regional climate policy: The case of renewable energy promotion by feed-in tariffs

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  • Heindl, Peter
  • Voigt, Sebastian

Abstract

For the case of the German state of Baden-Wuerttemberg, production and employment effects of the promotion of renewable energy sources are examined based on a regionalized input-output table. Our findings suggest that policy actions promoting renewable energy types do not necessarily create new jobs and additional turnover for the whole economy. They rather induce a structural change of the economy since other investments might be crowded out by investments in installations of renewable energy and the demand in other sectors might decrease. However, if the producers of the installations are able to export parts of their products to the rest of Germany and/or the rest of the world, these crowding out effects can be attenuated and turnover and employment effects might be positive for the state in total.

Suggested Citation

  • Heindl, Peter & Voigt, Sebastian, 2012. "Employment effects of regional climate policy: The case of renewable energy promotion by feed-in tariffs," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-066, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:12066
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tobias Kronenberg, 2009. "Construction of Regional Input-Output Tables Using Nonsurvey Methods," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 32(1), pages 40-64, January.
    2. Gay, Philip W. & Proops, John L.R., 1993. "Carbon---dioxide production by the UK economy: An input-output assessment," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 113-130.
    3. Hillebrand, Bernhard & Buttermann, Hans Georg & Behringer, Jean Marc & Bleuel, Michaela, 2006. "The expansion of renewable energies and employment effects in Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(18), pages 3484-3494, December.
    4. Tobias Kronenberg, 2010. "Erstellung einer Input-Output-Tabelle für Mecklenburg-Vorpommern," AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv, Springer;Deutsche Statistische Gesellschaft - German Statistical Society, vol. 4(3), pages 223-248, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stavropoulos, S. & Burger, M.J., 2020. "Modelling strategy and net employment effects of renewable energy and energy efficiency: A meta-regression," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 136(C).
    2. Growitsch Christian & Meier Helena & Schleich Sebastian, 2015. "Regionale Verteilungswirkungen des Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetzes," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 72-87, March.
    3. Ana Maria Montoya Gómez, 2020. "From Fossil Fuels to Renewables: Studies on the Effects of Resource Endowments and Climate Policy on Economic Outcomes," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 90.
    4. Heindl Peter & Aigeltinger Gerd & Liessem Verena & Römer Daniel & Schwengers Clarita & Vogt Claire, 2017. "Zum Stromkonsum von Haushalten in Grundsicherung: Eine empirische Analyse für Deutschland," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, De Gruyter, vol. 18(4), pages 348-367, November.
    5. Heindl, Peter, 2014. "Ökonomische Aspekte der Lastenverteilung in der Umweltpolitik am Beispiel der Energiewende: Ein Beitrag zum interdisziplinären Dialog," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-061, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    6. Dr. Christian Lutz & Dr. Ulrike Lehr & Philip Ulrich & Dr. Michael Schlesinger, 2012. "Analyse der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Effekte des Energiemarktes," GWS Discussion Paper Series 12-7, GWS - Institute of Economic Structures Research.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Renewable energy; Employment effects; Input output;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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