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Distributional and Welfare Effects of Germany's Year 2000 Tax Reform

  • Ochmann, Richard

This paper empirically investigates distributional and welfare effects of Germany's year 2000 tax reform. The reform is simulated in an ex-ante behavioral microsimulation approach. Dead weight loss of capital income taxation is estimated in a structural model for household savings and asset demand applied to German survey data. Significant reductions in tax rates result in income gains, especially in higher tax brackets, whereby income inequality increases, in particular in East-Germany. Moreover, households increase savings and alter the structure of asset demand due to shifts in relative asset prices. As a result, utility losses reduce welfare effects for almost all households.

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Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2011 (Frankfurt, Main): The Order of the World Economy - Lessons from the Crisis with number 48686.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc11:48686
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  1. Hochguertel, Stefan & Alessie, Rob & van Soest, Arthur, 1997. " Saving Accounts versus Stocks and Bonds in Household Portfolio Allocation," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 99(1), pages 81-97, March.
  2. François Bourguignon & Amadéo Spadaro, 2005. "Microsimulation as a tool for evaluating redistribution policies," PSE Working Papers halshs-00590863, HAL.
  3. Mas-Colell, Andreu & Whinston, Michael D. & Green, Jerry R., 1995. "Microeconomic Theory," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195102680, July.
  4. Hausman, Jerry A & Poterba, James M, 1987. "Household Behavior and the Tax Reform Act of 1986," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 101-19, Summer.
  5. Giacomo Corneo, 2005. "Verteilungsarithmetik der rot-grünen Einkommensteuerreform," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 125(2), pages 299-314.
  6. Stefan Homburg, 2000. "German Tax Reform 2000. Description and Appraisal," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 57(4), pages 504-513, August.
  7. Sule Alan & Kadir Atalay & Thomas Crossley & Sung-Hee Jeon, 2009. "New evidence on taxes and portfolio choice," IFS Working Papers W09/11, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Deaton,Angus & Muellbauer,John, 1980. "Economics and Consumer Behavior," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521296762.
  9. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Arthur Lewbel, 1994. "Tax reform and welfare measurement: do we need demand system estimation?," IFS Working Papers W94/11, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  10. King, Mervyn A. & Leape, Jonathan I., 1998. "Wealth and portfolio composition: Theory and evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 155-193, June.
  11. Gerhard Wagenhals, 2000. "Incentive and Redistribution Effects of the German Tax Reform 2000," Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim 188/2000, Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
  12. Michael Keen, 2002. "The German Tax Reform of 2000," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 9(5), pages 603-621, September.
  13. Richard Ochmann, 2010. "Differential Income Taxation and Household Asset Allocation," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1058, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  14. King, Mervyn A., 1983. "Welfare analysis of tax reforms using household data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 183-214, July.
  15. Peichl, Andreas & Ochmann, Richard, 2006. "Measuring distributional effects of fiscal reforms," FiFo Discussion Papers - Finanzwissenschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 06-9, University of Cologne, FiFo Institute for Public Economics.
  16. Martin Beznoska & Richard Ochmann, 2010. "Household Savings Decision and Income Uncertainty," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1046, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  17. Feldstein, Martin S, 1976. "Personal Taxation and Portfolio Composition: An Econometric Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(4), pages 631-50, July.
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