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The German Tax Reform of 2000

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  • Michael Keen

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Abstract

Fundamental tax reform was a long time coming to Germany, but the landmark package of reforms agreed in July 2000 is substantially altering the business and personal tax environment. This paper describes and evaluates those reforms. It assesses the likely impact on investment and labor supply, and focuses particularly on key structural aspects of reform: the end of imputation, and the abolition of tax on corporate holdings in other corporations. Given Germany's prominence in Europe, and the structure of fiscal relations within Germany, it evaluates too the likely impact on other jurisdictions. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Keen, 2002. "The German Tax Reform of 2000," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 9(5), pages 603-621, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:itaxpf:v:9:y:2002:i:5:p:603-621
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1020973705217
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Ochmann, 2016. "Distributional and welfare effects of Germany’s year 2000 tax reform: the context of savings and portfolio choice," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 93-123, August.
    2. Bauer, Christian & Davies, Ronald B. & Haufler, Andreas, 2014. "Economic integration and the optimal corporate tax structure with heterogeneous firms," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 42-56.
    3. Richard Ochmann, 2010. "Distributional and Welfare Effects of Germany's Year 2000 Tax Reform," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1083, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Weber, Anke, 2009. "An empirical analysis of the 2000 corporate tax reform in Germany: Effects on ownership and control in listed companies," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 57-66, March.
    5. n.d., 2013. "Italy's corporate tax reforms and firm-specific tax rates in the period 1998-2012," STUDI ECONOMICI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2013(111), pages 51-68.
    6. Mai Chi Dao, 2013. "International spillovers of labour market policies," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 417-446, April.
    7. von Beschwitz, Bastian, 2016. "Cash Windfalls and Acquisitions," International Finance Discussion Papers 1159, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    8. Siegel, Martin & Vogt, Verena & Sundmacher, Leonie, 2014. "From a conservative to a liberal welfare state: Decomposing changes in income-related health inequalities in Germany, 1994–2011," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 10-19.
    9. B. Eugène & P. Bisciari & M. Nautet & P. Stinglhamber & L. Van Meensel, 2013. "Trends in tax systems in the EU," Economic Review, National Bank of Belgium, issue iii, pages 27-45, December.
    10. Hannes Winner, 2012. "Fiscal Competition and the Composition of Public Expenditure: An Empirical Study," Contemporary Economics, University of Finance and Management in Warsaw, vol. 6(3), September.
    11. Frank Blasch & Alfons J. Weichenrieder, 2007. "When Taxation Changes the Course of the Year: Fiscal-Year Adjustments and the German Tax Reform of 2000-01," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 28(3), pages 367-377, September.
    12. Bastian von Beschwitz & Daniel Foos, 2016. "Banks' Equity Stakes and Lending : Evidence from a Tax Reform," International Finance Discussion Papers 1183, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

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