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The politics of public debt: Neoliberalism, capitalist development, and the restructuring of the state

  • Streeck, Wolfgang
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    Rising public debt has been widespread in democratic-capitalist political economies since the 1970s, generally accompanied among other things by weak economic growth, rising unemployment, increasing inequality, growing tax resistance, and declining political participation. Following an initial period of fiscal consolidation in the 1990s, public debt took an unprecedented leap in response to the Great Recession. Renewed consolidation efforts, under the pressure of financial markets, point to a general decline in state expenditure, particularly discretionary and investment expenditure, and of extensive retrenchment and privatization of state functions.

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    Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies in its series MPIfG Discussion Paper with number 13/7.

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    Date of creation: 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:mpifgd:137
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    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2010. "Growth in a Time of Debt," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 573-78, May.
    2. Thomas I. Palley, 2008. "Financialization: What it is and Why it Matters," IMK Working Paper 04-2008, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    3. Robert Boyer, 2012. "The four fallacies of contemporary austerity policies: the lost Keynesian legacy," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(1), pages 283-312.
    4. Carmen M. & M. Belen Sbrancia, 2011. "The Liquidation of Government Debt," Working Paper Series WP11-10, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    5. Thomas Herndon & Michael Ash & Robert Pollin, 2013. "Does High Public Debt Consistently Stifle Economic Growth? A Critique of Reinhart and Rogo ff," Working Papers wp322, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
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