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South-South FDI: Is it really different?

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  • Görg, Holger
  • Gold, Robert
  • Hanley, Aoife
  • Seric, Adnan

Abstract

We compare the performance of Northern and Southern multinationals in Sub-Saharan Africa, and contrast it with local firms in the host country. Employing unique firm level data for 19 Sub-Saharan African countries, we show that firms receiving FDI outperform domestic ones, while the origin of the foreign investor is of minor importance. We use three different definitions of "South" to compare Northern and Southern FDI. Overall, we do not find strong differences in terms of firm productivity growth between Northern and Southern FDI, irrespective of how the latter is defined. However, we find that employment growth is generally higher for firms receiving FDI from other African investors as compared to Northern FDI, and they also receive more technology transfer from their parent company abroad.

Suggested Citation

  • Görg, Holger & Gold, Robert & Hanley, Aoife & Seric, Adnan, 2017. "South-South FDI: Is it really different?," Kiel Working Papers 2083, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkwp:2083
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sourafel Girma & Yundan Gong & Holger Görg & Sandra Lancheros, 2016. "Estimating direct and indirect effects of foreign direct investment on firm productivity in the presence of interactions between firms," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES AND HOST COUNTRY DEVELOPMENT, chapter 12, pages 227-239, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    2. Holger Görg & David Greenaway, 2004. "Much Ado about Nothing? Do Domestic Firms Really Benefit from Foreign Direct Investment?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 19(2), pages 171-197.
    3. Agnès Bénassy‐Quéré & Maylis Coupet & Thierry Mayer, 2007. "Institutional Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(5), pages 764-782, May.
    4. Lipsey, Robert E. & Sjöholm, Fredrik, 2011. "South–South FDI and Development in East Asia," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 11-31.
    5. L. Pérez-Villar & A. Seric, 2015. "Multinationals in Sub-Saharan Africa: Domestic linkages and institutional distance," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 142, pages 94-117.
    6. Matthias Arnold, Jens & Javorcik, Beata S., 2009. "Gifted kids or pushy parents? Foreign direct investment and plant productivity in Indonesia," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 42-53, September.
    7. Amighini, Alessia & Sanfilippo, Marco, 2014. "Impact of South–South FDI and Trade on the Export Upgrading of African Economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 1-17.
    8. Alvaro Cuervo-Cazurra & Mehmet Genc, 2008. "Transforming disadvantages into advantages: developing-country MNEs in the least developed countries," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 39(6), pages 957-979, September.
    9. Dilek Aykut & Andrea Goldstein, 2006. "Developing Country Multinationals: South-South Investment Comes of Age," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 257, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Holger Görg & Aoife Hanley & Adnan Seric, 2018. "Corporate Social Responsibility in Global Supply Chains: Deeds Not Words," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(10), pages 1-15, October.
    2. Matteo Fiorini & Giorgia Giovannetti & Mauro Lanati & Filippo Santi, 2018. "Asymmetric Cultural Proximity and Greenfield FDI," Development Working Papers 434, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    South-South FDI; productivity; performance differences; Africa;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

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