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The impact of student diversity in secondary schools: An analysis of the international PISA data and implications for the German education system

  • Michaelowa, Katharina
  • Bourdon, Jean

While increased heterogeneity in schools (diversity) leads to reduced segregation and greater equity for students from different family backgrounds, it is often expected to have a negative impact on overall performance, and on student well-being and motivation. In this study, neither cross-country comparisons nor student-level analysis confirm this hypothesis. In some countries, students' overall achievement as well as their interest and engagement even appear to be positively influenced by diversity, notably by socio-economic and cultural diversity. In Germany, socio-economic diversity has a positive impact on student achievement, and ability related and cultural diversity positively affect interest and engagement in mathematics.

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Paper provided by Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI) in its series HWWI Research Papers with number 3-2.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwirp:3-2
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