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Do Quarantine Experiences and Attitudes Towards COVID-19 Affect the Distribution of Psychological Outcomes in China? A Quantile Regression Analysis

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  • Lu, Haiyang
  • Nie, Peng
  • Qian, Long

Abstract

While quarantine has become a widely used control measure during the outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), empirical research on whether and to what extent quarantine and attitudes towards COVID-19 influence psychological outcomes is scant. Using a cross-sectional online survey, this paper is the first to investigate the heterogeneous impact of quarantine experiences and attitudes towards COVID-19 on the whole distribution of psychological well-being in China. We find that credibility of real-time updates and confidence in the epidemic control are associated with a decline in depression but an increase in happiness. Such effects are stronger in the upper distribution of depression and the median of happiness. We also discern that individuals with severe depressive symptoms (or lower levels of happiness) are more susceptible to the severity of the pandemic. Moreover, home self-quarantine is associated a decrease in depression but an increase in happiness, by contrast, community-level quarantine discourages happiness, especially in the lower distribution of happiness.

Suggested Citation

  • Lu, Haiyang & Nie, Peng & Qian, Long, 2020. "Do Quarantine Experiences and Attitudes Towards COVID-19 Affect the Distribution of Psychological Outcomes in China? A Quantile Regression Analysis," GLO Discussion Paper Series 512, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:512
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    Cited by:

    1. Huebener, Matthias & Waights, Sevrin & Spieß, C. Katharina & Siegel, Nico A. & Wagner, Gert G., 2021. "Parental well-being in times of Covid-19 in Germany," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 91-122.
    2. Prakash, Navendu & Srivastava, Bhavya & Singh, Shveta & Sharma, Seema & Jain, Sonali, 2022. "Effectiveness of social distancing interventions in containing COVID-19 incidence: International evidence using Kalman filter," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 44(C).
    3. Daniel T. L. Shek, 2021. "COVID-19 and Quality of Life: Twelve Reflections," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 16(1), pages 1-11, February.
    4. Onur Altindag & Bilge Erten & Pinar Keskin, 2022. "Mental Health Costs of Lockdowns: Evidence from Age-Specific Curfews in Turkey," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 320-343, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Quarantine; Attitudes; Quantile regression; Psychological well-being;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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