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Fertility and Population Policy

Author

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  • Ouedraogo, Abdoulaye
  • Tosun, Mehmet S.
  • Yang, Jingjing

Abstract

There have been significant changes in both the fertility rates and fertility perception since 1970s. In this paper, we examine the relationship between government policies towards fertility and the fertility trends. Total fertility rate, defined as the number of children per woman, is used as the main fertility trend variable. We use panel data from the United Nations World Population Policies database, and the World Bank World Development Indicators for the period 1976 through 2013. We find significant negative association between a country’s fertility rate and its anti-fertility policy. On the other hand, there is no significant and robust relationship between the fertility rate and a country’s pro-fertility or family-planning policies. In addition we find evidence of spatial autocorrelation in the total fertility rate, and spatial spillovers from government’s policy on fertility.

Suggested Citation

  • Ouedraogo, Abdoulaye & Tosun, Mehmet S. & Yang, Jingjing, 2018. "Fertility and Population Policy," GLO Discussion Paper Series 163, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:163
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fertility rate; population; government policies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H10 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - General
    • H59 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Other
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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