IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Learning-by-Doing with Spillovers in Competitive Industries, Free Entry, and Regulatory Policy


  • Bläsi, Albrecht
  • Requate, Till


We study the impact of learning-by-doing with spillovers in competitive markets with free market entry. Within a two period model, we consider first the case where fixed costs are incurred only once, and entry is once and for all. In the second case fixed costs are incurred in each period, and both market exit after the first period and late entry in the second period is possible. For the first case first best allocations can only be decentralized by subsidizing output in the first period and additionally paying an entry premium. If exit and late entry are possible and if market exit by some firms is socially optimal, the optimal policy scheme requires a nonlinear output subsidy which serves to discriminate between exiting and staying firms. We further investigate the comparative statics effects of the different policy instruments.

Suggested Citation

  • Bläsi, Albrecht & Requate, Till, 2005. "Learning-by-Doing with Spillovers in Competitive Industries, Free Entry, and Regulatory Policy," Economics Working Papers 2005-09, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:cauewp:3195

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jim Jin & Juan Perote-Peña & Michael Troege, 2004. "Learning by doing, spillovers and shakeouts," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 85-98, January.
    2. Bardhan, Pranab K, 1971. "On Optimum Subsidy to a Learning Industry: An Aspect of the Theory of Infant-Industry Protection," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 12(1), pages 54-70, February.
    3. Argote, L. & Epple, D., 1990. "Learning Curves In Manufacturing," GSIA Working Papers 89-90-02, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
    4. Miravete, Eugenio J., 2003. "Time-consistent protection with learning by doing," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(5), pages 761-790, October.
    5. A. M. Spence, 1981. "The Learning Curve and Competition," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 12(1), pages 49-70, Spring.
    6. Dermot Leahy & J. Peter Neary, 1999. "Learning by Doing, Precommitment and Infant-Industry Promotion," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(2), pages 447-474.
    7. Dasgupta, Partha & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1988. "Learning-by-Doing, Market Structure and Industrial and Trade Policies," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 246-268, June.
    8. Rauch, James E., 1992. "A note on the optimum subsidy to a learning industry," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 233-243, January.
    9. Isoard, Stephane & Soria, Antonio, 2001. "Technical change dynamics: evidence from the emerging renewable energy technologies," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 619-636, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Joan Canton & Åsa Johannesson Lindén, 2010. "Support schemes for renewable electricity in the EU," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 408, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    2. Bläsi, Albrecht & Requate, Till, 2007. "Subsidies for Wind Power: Surfing down the Learning Curve?," Economics Working Papers 2007-28, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    3. Lehmann, Paul, 2009. "Climate Policies with Pollution Externalities and Learning Spillovers," MPRA Paper 21353, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Thure Traber & Claudia Kemfert, 2011. "Subsidies for Learning in Renewable Energy Technologies under Market Power and Emission Trading," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1126, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item


    learning-by-doing; spillovers; regulatory policy;

    JEL classification:

    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:cauewp:3195. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.