IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

"We're all in this together"? A DSGE interpretation


  • Richard McManus


The recent global economic downturn has resulted in hardship for many individuals and the unequal distribution of this hardship across agents is frequently debated. This paper constructs a small scale New Keynesian DSGE model to test whether individuals suffer to similar degrees during recessions: in effect testing the common political mantra `we're all in this together'. It does this by including heterogeneity in the actions of households through their access to capital markets distinguishing those with full access (Ricardian agents) from those with no access (rule-of-thumb agents). In aggregate welfare movements as a result of recessionary shocks are small but this hides a big divergence with the credit constrained signi cantly losing. There is a redistribution of welfare from non-Ricardian to Ricardian households from the shock, and under reasonable calibrations, the latter are seen to gain at the expense of the former.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard McManus, 2013. ""We're all in this together"? A DSGE interpretation," Discussion Papers 13/08, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:13/08

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: Main text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bilbiie, Florin O., 2008. "Limited asset markets participation, monetary policy and (inverted) aggregate demand logic," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 162-196, May.
    2. Boscá, J.E. & Doménech, R. & Ferri, J., 2011. "Search, Nash bargaining and rule-of-thumb consumers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 927-942.
    3. John Y. Campbell & N. Gregory Mankiw, 1989. "Consumption, Income and Interest Rates: Reinterpreting the Time Series Evidence," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1989, Volume 4, pages 185-246 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. repec:fth:harver:1435 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Andres, Javier & Domenech, Rafael & Fatas, Antonio, 2008. "The stabilizing role of government size," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 571-593, February.
    6. Peter N. Ireland, 2011. "A New Keynesian Perspective on the Great Recession," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(1), pages 31-54, February.
    7. Jappelli, Tullio & Pagano, Marco, 1989. "Consumption and Capital Market Imperfections: An International Comparison," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1088-1105, December.
    8. Andrea Colciago, 2011. "Rule‐of‐Thumb Consumers Meet Sticky Wages," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 325-353, March.
    9. Furlanetto Francesco & Seneca Martin, 2009. "Fiscal Shocks and Real Rigidities," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-33, February.
    10. Julio Rotemberg & Michael Woodford, 1997. "An Optimization-Based Econometric Framework for the Evaluation of Monetary Policy," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 297-361 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. IWATA Yasuharu, 2009. "Fiscal Policy in an Estimated DSGE Model of the Japanese Economy: Do Non-Ricardian Households Explain All?," ESRI Discussion paper series 216, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    12. Graham, Liam, 2008. "Consumption habits and labor supply," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 382-395, March.
    13. Mukoyama, Toshihiko & Sahin, Aysegul, 2006. "Costs of business cycles for unskilled workers," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(8), pages 2179-2193, November.
    14. Francesco Furlanetto & Martin Seneca, 2012. "Rule-of-Thumb Consumers, Productivity, and Hours," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(2), pages 658-679, June.
    15. Per Krusell & Toshihiko Mukoyama & Aysegul Sahin & Anthony A. Smith, Jr., 2009. "Revisiting the Welfare Effects of Eliminating Business Cycles," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(3), pages 393-402, July.
    16. Sarantis, Nicholas & Stewart, Chris, 2003. "Liquidity constraints, precautionary saving and aggregate consumption: an international comparison," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 1151-1173, December.
    17. Robert E. Lucas Jr., 2003. "Macroeconomic Priorities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 1-14, March.
    18. Frank Smets & Raf Wouters, 2003. "An Estimated Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model of the Euro Area," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(5), pages 1123-1175, September.
    19. Evans, Paul & Karras, Georgios, 1996. "Private and government consumption with liquidity constraints," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 255-266, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Krawczyk, Jacek B & Townsend, Wilbur, 2015. "Viability of an economy with constrained inequality," Working Paper Series 4689, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.

    More about this item


    Cost of business cycles; rule-of-thumb consumers; welfare; heterogeneity;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:13/08. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Paul Hodgson). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.