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Private information in life insurance, annuity and health insurance markets

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  • Wuppermann, A.C.

Abstract

Economic theory predicts that private information on risks in insurance markets leads to adverse selection. To counterbalance private information insurers collect and use information on applicants to assess their risk and calculate premiums in an underwriting process. Using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) this paper documents that di erences in the information used in underwriting across life insurance, annuity and health insurance markets attenuate private information to di erent extents. The results are in line with - and might help to reconcile - the mixed empirical evidence on adverse selection across these markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Wuppermann, A.C., 2014. "Private information in life insurance, annuity and health insurance markets," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/15, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:14/15
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tomas Philipson & John Cawley, 1999. "An Empirical Examination of Information Barriers to Trade in Insurance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 827-846, September.
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    3. M. Kate Bundorf & Jonathan Levin & Neale Mahoney, 2012. "Pricing and Welfare in Health Plan Choice," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(7), pages 3214-3248, December.
    4. Amy Finkelstein & James Poterba, 2004. "Adverse Selection in Insurance Markets: Policyholder Evidence from the U.K. Annuity Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(1), pages 183-208, February.
    5. Alma Cohen & Peter Siegelman, 2010. "Testing for Adverse Selection in Insurance Markets," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 77(1), pages 39-84.
    6. David M. Cutler & Amy Finkelstein & Kathleen McGarry, 2008. "Preference Heterogeneity and Insurance Markets: Explaining a Puzzle of Insurance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 157-162, May.
    7. Nathaniel Hendren, 2013. "Private Information and Insurance Rejections," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 81(5), pages 1713-1762, September.
    8. Liran Einav & Amy Finkelstein & Paul Schrimpf, 2010. "Optimal Mandates and the Welfare Cost of Asymmetric Information: Evidence From the U.K. Annuity Market," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(3), pages 1031-1092, May.
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    11. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, January.
    12. Lo Sasso, Anthony T. & Lurie, Ithai Z., 2009. "Community rating and the market for private non-group health insurance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1-2), pages 264-279, February.
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    14. repec:rje:randje:v:37:y:2006:i:4:p:783-798 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    ELSA; private information; health-related risks; insurance; biomarkers;

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private

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