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Trust in trade: The causal role of social trust on individual trade preferences

Listed author(s):
  • Bernauer, Thomas
  • Nguyen, Quynh
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    While most explanations of individual trade policy preferences center on the redistributional implications of trade, recent research is particularly interested in the role of non-economic determinants. We join the latter line of research by studying the effect of social trust. Our research breaks new methodological ground by testing the hypothesized causal effect of social trust in a field survey experiment that combines a voluntary contribution game with a survey. The empirical work was carried out in Hanoi, Vietnam. The findings offer robust support for the argument that social trust has a positive causal effect on public support for international trade.

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    File URL: http://www.wti.org/media/filer_public/de/3b/de3b8aef-589f-44fa-8a82-8eb359072ee9/nguyen_bernauer_2014.pdf
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    Paper provided by World Trade Institute in its series Papers with number 740.

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    Date of creation: 08 Jul 2014
    Handle: RePEc:wti:papers:740
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    1. Kinder, Donald R. & Kiewiet, D. Roderick, 1981. "Sociotropic Politics: The American Case," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(02), pages 129-161, April.
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    9. Mayda, Anna Maria & Rodrik, Dani, 2005. "Why are some people (and countries) more protectionist than others?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1393-1430, August.
    10. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57, November.
    11. K. H. O'Rourke & R. Sinnott, 2001. "The Determinants of Individual Trade Policy Preferences: International Survey Evidence," CEG Working Papers 20016, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    12. Mark Isaac, R. & McCue, Kenneth F. & Plott, Charles R., 1985. "Public goods provision in an experimental environment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 51-74, February.
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    14. Cason, Timothy N. & Khan, Feisal U., 1999. "A laboratory study of voluntary public goods provision with imperfect monitoring and communication," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 533-552, April.
    15. Anatol Rapoport, 1988. "Experiments with N-Person Social Traps II," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 32(3), pages 473-488, September.
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