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Evidences on Household Labour Supply when Labour Demand is not Perfectly Elastic Keywords: Labour Supply, Labour Demand, Equilibrium

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  • Edlira Narazani

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Abstract

The simulations of tax-benefit reforms with labour supply models often implicitly assume perfectly elastic labour demand, an assumption that may lead to unrealistic results. In this study we attempt to address this limitation and show how the interaction between labour supply and labour demand would affect the outcome of a certain reform. We introduce a “wage subsidy scheme”, as it is commonly proved to produce labor incentives and find that, when labour demand is not considered as perfectly elastic, the simulated labor supply results to be lower for women compared to the perfectly elastic scenario but higher for their male partners. We explain this disparate behavior through the differences in cross wage elasticities the selected couples exhibit and the way labour preferences are shared between partners. These empirical findings provide a new understanding of behavioural microsimulation models and their ability to evaluate tax-transfer reforms.

Suggested Citation

  • Edlira Narazani, 2011. "Evidences on Household Labour Supply when Labour Demand is not Perfectly Elastic Keywords: Labour Supply, Labour Demand, Equilibrium," CHILD Working Papers wp22_11, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpc:wplist:wp22_11
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    File URL: http://www.child.carloalberto.org/images/wp/child22_2011.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stefan Boeters & Michael Feil & Nicole Gürtzgen, 2007. "Discrete Working Time Choice in an Applied General Equilibrium Model," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 29(3), pages 427-427, May.
    2. John Creedy & Alan Duncan, 2005. "Aggregating Labour Supply and Feedback Effects in Microsimulation," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 8(3), pages 277-290, September.
    3. Peichl, Andreas & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2012. "Accounting for labor demand effects in structural labor supply models," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 129-138.
    4. Colombino Ugo & Locatelli Marilena & Narazani Edlira & O'Donoghue Cathal, 2010. "Alternative Basic Income Mechanisms: An Evaluation Exercise With a Microeconometric Model," Basic Income Studies, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-31, September.
    5. Stefan Boeters & Michael Feil, 2009. "Heterogeneous Labour Markets in a Microsimulation–AGE Model: Application to Welfare Reform in Germany," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 33(4), pages 305-335, May.
    6. Narazani, Edlira & Shima, Isilda, 2008. "Labour supply modelling in Italy when Minimum Income Scheme is an option," EUROMOD Working Papers EM6/08, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Creedy, John & Duncan, Alan, 2002. " Behavioural Microsimulation with Labour Supply Responses," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(1), pages 1-39, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions

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