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Within-Team Competition in the Minimum Effort Coordination Game

Author

Listed:
  • Enrique Fatas

    (University Valencia)

  • Tibor Neugebauer

    (University Hannover)

  • Javier Perote

    (Juan Carlos University Madrid)

Abstract

We report the results of an experiment on a continuous version of the minimum effort coordination game. The introduction of within-team competition significantly increases effort levels relative to a baseline with no competition and increases coordination relative to a secure treatment where the payoff-dominant equilibrium strategy weakly dominates all other actions. Nonetheless, within-team competition does not prevent subjects to polarize both in the efficient and the inefficient equilibria.

Suggested Citation

  • Enrique Fatas & Tibor Neugebauer & Javier Perote, 2005. "Within-Team Competition in the Minimum Effort Coordination Game," Experimental 0503006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpex:0503006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bortolotti, Stefania & Devetag, Giovanna & Ortmann, Andreas, 2016. "Group incentives or individual incentives? A real-effort weak-link experiment," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 60-73.
    2. Grossman, Philip J. & Eckel, Catherine & Komai, Mana & Zhan, Wei, 2019. "It pays to be a man: Rewards for leaders in a coordination game," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 197-215.
    3. Rachel Croson & Enrique Fatas & Tibor Neugebauer, 2006. "An Experimental Analysis Of Conditional Cooperation," Working Papers. Serie AD 2006-24, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    4. Stephan Schosser & Bodo Vogt, 2015. "Do hormones impact behavior in the minimum effort game? - An experimental investigation of human behavior during the weakest link game after the administration of vasopressin -," FEMM Working Papers 150011, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    5. Gunnthorsdottir, Anna & Vragov, Roumen & Seifert, Stefan & McCabe, Kevin, 2010. "Near-efficient equilibria in contribution-based competitive grouping," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(11-12), pages 987-994, December.
    6. Baethge, Caroline & Fiedler, Marina, 2016. "Aligning mission preferences: Does self-selection foster performance in working groups?," Passauer Diskussionspapiere, Betriebswirtschaftliche Reihe B-18-16, University of Passau, Faculty of Business and Economics.
    7. Casagrande, Alberto & Cagno, Daniela Di & Pandimiglio, Alessandro & Spallone, Marco, 2015. "The effect of competition on tax compliance: The role of audit rules and shame," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 96-110.
    8. Sebastian J. Goerg & Tibor Neugebauer & Abdolkarim Sadrieh, 2016. "Impulse Response Dynamics in Weakest Link Games," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 17(3), pages 284-297, August.
    9. Jordi Brandts & David Cooper & Enrique Fatas, 2007. "Leadership and overcoming coordination failure with asymmetric costs," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 10(3), pages 269-284, September.
    10. Croson, Rachel & Fatas, Enrique & Neugebauer, Tibor & Morales, Antonio J., 2015. "Excludability: A laboratory study on forced ranking in team production," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 13-26.
    11. Carlos E. Jijena Michel & Javier Perote & José D. Vicente-Lorente, 2018. "Efficiency and Sustainability in Teamwork: The Role of Entry Costs," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(7), pages 1-19, July.
    12. Fabrice Le Lec & Astrid Matthey & Ondrej Rydval, 2012. "Punishment Fosters Efficiency in the Minimum Effort Coordination Game," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-030, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    13. Fabrice Le Lec & Ondrej Rydval & Astrid Matthey, 2014. "Efficiency and Punishment in a Coordination Game: Voluntary Sanctions in the Minimum Effort Game," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp526, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    14. Gunnthorsdottir, Anna & Vragov, Roumen & seifert, Stefan & McCabe, Kevin, 2008. "on the efficiency of team-based meritocracies," MPRA Paper 8627, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Coordination Games; Team Incentives; Minimum Effort Game;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior

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