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The Economic System As An End Or As A Means And The Future Of Socialism And Capitalism: An Evolutionary Viewpoint

  • Alberto Chilosi

    (University of Pisa)

After the demise of “real” socialism and the decline of “western” socialism, socialism can be salvaged as a social preference system oriented towards equality and social justice, to be implemented without systemic constraints in the organizational and institutional sense. At the same time there is a case for maintaining an institutional framework allowing different forms of economic organization, capitalist and non- capitalist, to compete on equal footing, in an evolutionary perspective, thus allowing the second to develop if proven efficient. Another way for a spontaneous extension of the domain of socialism could derive from the socialization of consumption, if the consumption of public goods continues to make up a growing component of real consumption.

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File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/dev/papers/0305/0305003.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0305003.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: 30 May 2003
Date of revision: 14 Sep 2003
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0305003
Note: Type of Document - pdf; prepared on windows xp; to print on any; pages: 23 ; figures: included
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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  1. Corneo, Giacomo, 2001. "Work and Television," IZA Discussion Papers 376, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Anderberg, D. & Andersson, F. & Balestrino, A., 1999. "Time, Self-Selection and User Charges for Public Goods," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 526, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  3. Gordon, Robert J, 2000. "Does the 'New Economy' Measure up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2607, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Bergson, Abram, 1992. "Communist Economic Efficiency Revisited," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 27-30, May.
  5. Samuel Bowles, 1998. "Endogenous Preferences: The Cultural Consequences of Markets and Other Economic Institutions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 75-111, March.
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