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Income, distance and spatial effects in the Monocentric model. The Barcelona Metropolitan Area case

  • Rafa Madariaga

    ()

  • Joan Carles Martori
  • Ramon Oller

This paper focuses on the income distribution of households in Barcelona Metropolitan Area. For this purpose we use the Monocentric model. As the basic model does not have direct implications for this distribution, we survey the extensions of the model that have been used in empirical literature. One of the most promising ways is to introduce externalities in the decision process; they can result directly from exogenous amenities (natural traits of urban area) or be created directly by other agents’ decisions. In this case, a spatial lag model and spatial error model are suited for the empirical purposes. We present evidence that any model with spatial effects improves significantly the econometric results.

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Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa11p511.

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Date of creation: Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa11p511
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  1. Daniel P. McMillen, 2010. "Issues In Spatial Data Analysis," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 119-141.
  2. Joan Carles Martori & Jordi Suriñach-Caralt, 2001. "Classical models of urban population density. The case of Barcelona Metropolitan Area," ERSA conference papers ersa01p46, European Regional Science Association.
  3. LeRoy, Stephen F. & Sonstelie, Jon, 1983. "Paradise lost and regained: Transportation innovation, income, and residential location," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 67-89, January.
  4. Baum-Snow, Nathaniel, 2007. "Suburbanization and transportation in the monocentric model," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(3), pages 405-423, November.
  5. James G. MacKinnon & Halbert White, 1983. "Some Heteroskedasticity Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimators with Improved Finite Sample Properties," Working Papers 537, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  6. Charles A. M. de Bartolome & Stephen L. Ross, 2002. "Equilibria with Local Governments and Commuting: Income Sorting vs. Income Mixing," Working papers 2002-01, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2003.
  7. Anselin, Luc, 2002. "Under the hood Issues in the specification and interpretation of spatial regression models," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 27(3), November.
  8. Edwin S. Mills & Luan Sende Lubuele, 1997. "Inner Cities," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(2), pages 727-756, June.
  9. Daniel P. McMillen & Christian L. Redfearn, 2010. "Estimation And Hypothesis Testing For Nonparametric Hedonic House Price Functions," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(3), pages 712-733.
  10. Tomoya Mori, 2006. "Monocentric Versus Polycentric Models in Urban Economics," KIER Working Papers 611, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  11. Rappaport, Jordan & Kahn, Matthew E. & Glaeser, Edward, 2008. "Why Do The Poor Live In Cities? The Role of Public Transportation," Scholarly Articles 2958224, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  12. Mur, Jesús & Angulo, Ana, 2009. "Model selection strategies in a spatial setting: Some additional results," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 200-213, March.
  13. Anselin, Luc, 2002. "Under the hood : Issues in the specification and interpretation of spatial regression models," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 27(3), pages 247-267, November.
  14. McDonald, John F. & Bowman, H. Woods, 1976. "Some tests of alternative urban population density functions," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 242-252, July.
  15. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416.
  16. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  17. Peter Mieszkowski & Edwin S. Mills, 1993. "The Causes of Metropolitan Suburbanization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 135-147, Summer.
  18. de Bartolome, Charles A.M. & Ross, Stephen L., 2007. "Community income distributions in a metropolitan area," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 496-518, May.
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