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Modelling the Energy Demand of Households in a Combined Top Down/Bottom Up Approach

  • Kurt Kratena

    (WIFO)

  • Ina Meyer

    (WIFO)

  • Michael Wüger

    (WIFO)

This paper deals with integrating elements of a bottom-up model of energy demand into a top-down model of total private consumption. The bottom-up elements are represented by the energy efficiency embodied in household appliances. The top-down model describes demand for energy and non-energy commodities in an AIDS demand system. In this model households do not directly demand energy, but energy services (hours of washing, miles of driving). These services are measured via the service price defined as the relationship between the energy price and energy efficiency. Therefore an increase in energy efficiency leads to a decrease in the service price and, thereby, increases demand for services which compensates for parts of the energy savings due to efficiency improvements ("rebound effect"). The model presented can be used to derive different feedbacks (rebound effects) from efficiency changes on energy demand and to quantify the role of efficiency improvements in reducing energy demand and emissions from households.

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Paper provided by WIFO in its series WIFO Working Papers with number 321.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 21 May 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wfo:wpaper:y:2008:i:321
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  1. Willett, Keith D. & Naghshpour, Shahdad, 1987. "Residential demand for energy commodities : A household production function approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 251-256, October.
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  7. Richard G. Newell & Adam B. Jaffe & Robert N. Stavins, 1999. "The Induced Innovation Hypothesis And Energy-Saving Technological Change," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(3), pages 941-975, August.
  8. J. Daniel Khazzoom, 1989. "Energy Savings from More Efficient Appliances: A Rejoinder," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 157-166.
  9. Nic Rivers & Mark Jaccard, 2005. "Combining Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches to Energy-Economy Modeling Using Discrete Choice Methods," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 83-106.
  10. Conrad, K & Schroder, M, 1991. "Demand for Durable and Nondurable Goods, Environmental Policy and Consumer Welfare," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(3), pages 271-86, July-Sept.
  11. Holtedahl, Pernille & Joutz, Frederick L., 2004. "Residential electricity demand in Taiwan," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 201-224, March.
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  13. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-26, June.
  14. Sue Wing, Ian, 2006. "Representing induced technological change in models for climate policy analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(5-6), pages 539-562, November.
  15. Larsen, Bodil Merethe & Nesbakken, Runa, 2004. "Household electricity end-use consumption: results from econometric and engineering models," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 179-200, March.
  16. Meyer, I. & Leimbach, M. & Jaeger, C.C., 2007. "International passenger transport and climate change: A sector analysis in car demand and associated CO2 emissions from 2000 to 2050," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 6332-6345, December.
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