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Creditor Protection and Banking System Development in India

Author

Listed:
  • Simon Deakin

    (University of Cambridge)

  • Panicos Demetriades

    (University of Leicester)

  • Gregory James

    (University of Leicester)

Abstract

We use a new legal dataset tracking changes in creditor protection law over several decades to study the impact of legal reform on banking system development in India. Cointegration analysis is used to show that the strengthening of creditor rights in relation to the enforcement of security iterests in the 1990s and 2000s led to an increase in bank credit. We show that the change in the law was not endogenous to trends in stock market development and GDP per capita, and that the direction of causation ran from legal reform to banking development, rather than the reverse.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Deakin & Panicos Demetriades & Gregory James, 2008. "Creditor Protection and Banking System Development in India," WEF Working Papers 0038, ESRC World Economy and Finance Research Programme, Birkbeck, University of London.
  • Handle: RePEc:wef:wpaper:0038
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Simon DEAKIN & Priya LELE & Mathias SIEMS, 2007. "The evolution of labour law: Calibrating and comparing regulatory regimes," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 146(3-4), pages 133-162, September.
    2. Djankov, Simeon & McLiesh, Caralee & Shleifer, Andrei, 2007. "Private credit in 129 countries," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 299-329, May.
    3. Demetriades, Panicos O. & Hussein, Khaled A., 1996. "Does financial development cause economic growth? Time-series evidence from 16 countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 387-411, December.
    4. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1998. "Law and Finance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(6), pages 1113-1155, December.
    5. Arestis, Philip & Demetriades, Panicos O & Luintel, Kul B, 2001. "Financial Development and Economic Growth: The Role of Stock Markets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 16-41, February.
    6. Armour, John & Deakin, Simon & Sarkar, Prabirjit & Siems, Mathias & Singh, Ajit, 2007. "Shareholder protection and stockmarket development: an empirical test of the legal origins hypothesis," MPRA Paper 39055, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Mathias Siems & Priya Lele, 2006. "Shareholder Protection: A Leximetric Approach," Working Papers wp324, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    8. Panicos O. Demetriades & Kul B. Luintel, 1997. "The Direct Costs Of Financial Repression: Evidence From India," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(2), pages 311-320, May.
    9. John Armour & Priya Lele, 2008. "Law, Finance, and Politics: The Case of India," Working Papers wp361, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Deakin, S. & Sarkar, P. & Singh, A., 2011. "An End to Consensus? The Selective Impact of Corporate Law Reform on Financial Development," Working Papers wp423, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    2. repec:eee:irlaec:v:52:y:2017:i:c:p:29-43 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Simon Deakin, 2013. "The Legal Framework Governing Business Firms & its Implications for Manufacturing Scale & Performance: The UK Experience in International Perspective," Working Papers wp449, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    4. Laura Capera & Andrés Murcia Pabón & Dairo Estrada, "undated". "Efectos de los Límites a las Tasas de Interés sobre la Profundización Financiera," Temas de Estabilidad Financiera 057, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    5. Maimbo, Samuel Munzele & Henriquez Gallegos, Claudia Alejandra, 2014. "Interest rate caps around the world: still popular, but a blunt instrument," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7070, The World Bank.
    6. Ding Chen & Simon Deakin, 2014. "On Heaven's Lathe: State, Rule of Law, & Economic Development," Working Papers wp464, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    7. Armour, J. & Deakin, S. & Mollica, V. & Siems, M.M., 2010. "Law and Financial Development: What we are learning from time-series evidence," Working Papers wp399, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    8. Deakin, Simon & Sarkar, Prabirjit & Singh, Ajit, 2010. "An End to Consensus? The (Non) Impact of Legal Reforms on Financial Development," MPRA Paper 53352, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. repec:pal:compes:v:60:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1057_s41294-017-0047-z is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Samargandi, Nahla & Kutan, Ali M., 2016. "Private credit spillovers and economic growth: Evidence from BRICS countries," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 56-84.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    creditor rights; legal origin; banking development; India;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • K22 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law - - - Business and Securities Law
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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