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Rapid Economic Growth At The Cost Of Environment Degradation? ??? Panel Data Evidience From Bric Economies

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  • Juan P. Chousa,

    ()

  • Artur Tamazian

    ()

  • Krishna Chaitanya Vadlamannati

    ()

Abstract

The paper investigates whether the decline in environmental quality in BRIC economies is due to high energy consumption level which is a resultant of rapid economic growth. We answer this using environmental, macroeconomic and financial variables along with Kyoto Protocol indicators based on panel data from 1992 to 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan P. Chousa, & Artur Tamazian & Krishna Chaitanya Vadlamannati, 2008. "Rapid Economic Growth At The Cost Of Environment Degradation? ??? Panel Data Evidience From Bric Economies," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp908, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2008-908
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    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/64409/1/wp908.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Levine, Ross & Zervos, Sara, 1998. "Stock Markets, Banks, and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 537-558, June.
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    3. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    CO2 Emissions; Energy Consumption; Economic Growth; BRIC economies.;

    JEL classification:

    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

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