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Maternal and child health inequalities in Ethiopia

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  • Ambel,Alemayehu A.
  • Andrews,Colin
  • Bakilana,Anne Margreth
  • Foster,Elizabeth
  • Khan,Qaiser M.
  • Wang,Huihui

Abstract

Recent surveys show considerable progress in maternal and child health in Ethiopia. The improvement has been in health outcomes and health services coverage. The study examines how different groups have fared in this progress. It tracked 11 health outcome indicators and health interventions related to Millennium Development Goals 1, 4, and 5. These are stunting, underweight, wasting, neonatal mortality, infant mortality, under-five mortality, measles vaccination, full immunization, modern contraceptive use by currently married women, antenatal care visits, and skilled birth attendance. The study explores trends in inequalities by household wealth status, mothers? education, and place of residence. It is based on four Demographic and Health Surveys implemented in 2000, 2005, 2011, and 2014. Trends in rate differences and rate ratios are analyzed. The study also investigates the dynamics of inequalities, using concentration curves for different years. In addition, a decomposition analysis is conducted to identify the role of proximate determinants. The study finds substantial improvements in health outcomes and health services. Although there still exists a considerable gap between the rich and the poor, the study finds some reductions in inequalities of health services. However, some of the improvements in selected health outcomes appear to be pro-rich.

Suggested Citation

  • Ambel,Alemayehu A. & Andrews,Colin & Bakilana,Anne Margreth & Foster,Elizabeth & Khan,Qaiser M. & Wang,Huihui, 2015. "Maternal and child health inequalities in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7508, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7508
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Owen O'Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer & Adam Wagstaff & Magnus Lindelow, 2008. "Analyzing Health Equity Using Household Survey Data : A Guide to Techniques and Their Implementation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6896, June.
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    3. Kruk, M.E. & Prescott, M.R. & Galea, S., 2008. "Equity of skilled birth attendant utilization in developing countries: Financing and policy determinants," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 98(1), pages 142-147.
    4. Adam Wagstaff & Marcel Bilger & Zurab Sajaia & Michael Lokshin, 2011. "Health Equity and Financial Protection : Streamlined Analysis with ADePT Software," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2306, June.
    5. Kakwani, Nanak & Wagstaff, Adam & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 1997. "Socioeconomic inequalities in health: Measurement, computation, and statistical inference," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 87-103, March.
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    1. Gebretsadik Shibre & Dina Idriss-Wheeler & Sanni Yaya, 2020. "Inequalities and trends in Neonatal Mortality Rate (NMR) in Ethiopia: Evidence from the Ethiopia Demographic and Health Surveys, 2000–2016," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(6), pages 1-10, June.

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    Keywords

    Health Economics&Finance; Reproductive Health;

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