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Vulnerability to malnutrition in the West African Sahel

Author

Listed:
  • Alfani, Federica
  • Dabalen, Andrew
  • Fisker, Peter
  • Molini, Vasco

Abstract

This study estimates marginal increase in malnutrition for children ages 1-3 years from exposure to an extreme shock in the West African Sahel. The study uses knowledge of a child's birth and high resolution spatial and temporal distribution of shocks, calculated from the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and satellite-based measures of rainfall and temperature to link a child to the shock experienced in-utero. The study finds that while around 20 percent of the children in the sample are stunted or underweight, more than 30 percent of the children in the sample are highly vulnerable to either form of malnutrition.

Suggested Citation

  • Alfani, Federica & Dabalen, Andrew & Fisker, Peter & Molini, Vasco, 2015. "Vulnerability to malnutrition in the West African Sahel," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7171, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7171
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Chen, Xi, 2014. "Fetus, Fasting, and Festival: The Persistent Effects of in Utero Social Shocks," IZA Discussion Papers 8494, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Hai‐Anh H. Dang & Peter F. Lanjouw, 2017. "Welfare Dynamics Measurement: Two Definitions of a Vulnerability Line and Their Empirical Application," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(4), pages 633-660, December.
    7. Townsend, Robert M, 1994. "Risk and Insurance in Village India," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(3), pages 539-591, May.
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    11. Peter Fisker, 2014. "Green Lights: Quantifying the economic impacts of drought," IFRO Working Paper 2014/11, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bauer, Jan M. & Mburu, Samuel, 2017. "Effects of drought on child health in Marsabit District, Northern Kenya," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 74-79.

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    Keywords

    Science of Climate Change; Population Policies; Rural Poverty Reduction; Regional Economic Development; Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases;

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