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SME registration evidence from a randomized controlled trial in Bangladesh

Author

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  • De Giorgi, Giacomo
  • Rahman, Aminur

Abstract

Informality is pervasive in developing countries. In Bangladesh, the majority of firms are informal and as such they might not have access to prime markets, while lowering the tax base. The authors implemented an information campaign on registration, including both the step-by-step procedures and the potential benefits from registration. They find that the treatment made firms more aware of the procedures, but had no impact on actual registration. The results point toward potentially low benefits and high indirect costs of registration as the main barriers to formality (e.g. access to markets, taxation, labor and product regulations).

Suggested Citation

  • De Giorgi, Giacomo & Rahman, Aminur, 2013. "SME registration evidence from a randomized controlled trial in Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6382, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6382
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Suresh de Mel & David McKenzie & Christopher Woodruff, 2013. "The Demand for, and Consequences of, Formalization among Informal Firms in Sri Lanka," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 122-150, April.
    2. Kaplan, David S. & Piedra, Eduardo & Seira, Enrique, 2011. "Entry regulation and business start-ups: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(11), pages 1501-1515.
    3. Miriam Bruhn, 2011. "License to Sell: The Effect of Business Registration Reform on Entrepreneurial Activity in Mexico," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(1), pages 382-386, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rothenberg, Alexander D. & Gaduh, Arya & Burger, Nicholas E. & Chazali, Charina & Tjandraningsih, Indrasari & Radikun, Rini & Sutera, Cole & Weilant, Sarah, 2016. "Rethinking Indonesia’s Informal Sector," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 96-113.
    2. Natalia Salazar Ferro & Carlos Antonio Mesa & Natalia Navarrete, 2017. "La estructura de las tarifas de registro en las Cámaras de Comercio y beneficios de sus servicios : impacto sobre la competitividad y la formalidad empresarial," Informes de Investigación 015726, Fedesarrollo.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    E-Business; Economic Theory&Research; Microfinance; Access to Finance; Technology Industry;
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