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Impacts of an early stage education intervention on students'learning achievement : evidence from the Philippines

  • Yamauchi, Futoshi
  • Liu, Yanyan

This paper examines the impact of a large supply-side education intervention in the Philippines, the Third Elementary Education Project, on students'national achievement test scores. It finds that the program significantly increased student test scores at grades 4 to 6. The estimation indicates that two-year exposure to the program increases test scores by about 4.5 to 5 score points. Interestingly, the mathematics score is more responsive to the education reform than are other subjects. The analysis also finds that textbooks, instructional training of teachers, and new classroom construction particularly contributed to these outcomes. The empirical results imply that early-stage investment improves student performance at later stages in the elementary school cycle, which suggests that social returns to such an investment are greater than what the current study demonstrates.

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Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 6246.

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Date of creation: 01 Oct 2012
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6246
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  1. Richard K. Crump & V. Joseph Hotz & Guido W. Imbens & Oscar A. Mitnik, 2009. "Dealing with limited overlap in estimation of average treatment effects," Biometrika, Biometrika Trust, vol. 96(1), pages 187-199.
  2. Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2006. "Early childhood nutrition, schooling, and sibling inequality in a dynamic context: evidence from South Africa," FCND briefs 203, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2005. "Why Do Schooling Returns Differ? Screening, Private Schools, and Labor Markets in the Philippines and Thailand," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(4), pages 959-81, July.
  4. Alderman,Harold & Hoddinott, John & Kinsey, Bill, 2003. "Long-term consequences of early childhood malnutrition," FCND briefs 168, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. John A. Maluccio & John Hoddinott & Jere R. Behrman & Reynaldo Martorell & Agnes R. Quisumbing & Aryeh D. Stein, 2009. "The Impact of Improving Nutrition During Early Childhood on Education among Guatemalan Adults," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(537), pages 734-763, 04.
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