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Wage dynamics, turnover, and human capital : evidence from adolescent transition from school to work in the Philippines

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  • Yamauchi, Futoshi

Abstract

This paper examines wage dynamics and turnover using tracking data of adolescents from the Philippines. The analysis uses individual test scores in grade 6 to proxy abilities. The empirical results show that (i) returns to labor market experience are large, nearly a half of the conventional estimate of returns to schooling; (ii) returns to experience are higher if educational attainment and/or test scores are higher; and (iii) ability, measured by test scores, positively influences the upgrading of occupations toward more skilled categories, although educational attainment plays an important role in determining the first occupation. The complementarity between schooling and experience is greater among good performers who show high test scores; education and ability augment gains from accumulating labor market experiences.

Suggested Citation

  • Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2015. "Wage dynamics, turnover, and human capital : evidence from adolescent transition from school to work in the Philippines," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7184, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7184
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    18. Futoshi Yamauchi & Nipon Poapongsakorn & Nipa Srianant, 2009. "Technical Change and the Returns and Investments in Firm-level Training: Evidence from Thailand," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(10), pages 1633-1650.
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    Keywords

    Labor Markets; Tertiary Education; Secondary Education; Educational Sciences; Teaching and Learning;

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