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What is behind the decline in poverty since 2000 ? evidence from Bangladesh, Peru and Thailand

Author

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  • Inchauste, Gabriela
  • Olivieri, Sergio
  • Saavedra, Jaime
  • Winkler, Hernan

Abstract

This paper quantifies the contributions of different factors to poverty reduction observed in Bangladesh, Peru and Thailand over the last decade. In contrast to methods that focus on aggregate summary statistics, the method adopted here generates entire counterfactual distributions to account for the contributions of demographics and income from labor and non-labor sources in explaining poverty reduction. The authors find that the most important contributor was the growth in labor income, mostly in the form of farm income in Bangladesh and Thailand and non-farm income in the case of Peru. This growth in labor incomes was driven by higher returns to individual and household endowments, pointing to increases in productivity and real wages as the driving force behind poverty declines. Lower dependency ratios also helped to reduce poverty, particularly in Bangladesh. Non-labor income contributed as well, albeit to a smaller extent, in the form of international remittances in the case of Bangladesh and through public and private transfers in Peru and Thailand. Transfers are more important in explaining the reduction in extreme compared with moderate poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Inchauste, Gabriela & Olivieri, Sergio & Saavedra, Jaime & Winkler, Hernan, 2012. "What is behind the decline in poverty since 2000 ? evidence from Bangladesh, Peru and Thailand," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6199, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6199
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stanislav Kolenikov & Anthony Shorrocks, 2005. "A Decomposition Analysis of Regional Poverty in Russia," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(1), pages 25-46, February.
    2. Jenkins, Stephen P., 2011. "Changing Fortunes: Income Mobility and Poverty Dynamics in Britain," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199226436.
    3. Train, Kenneth & Wilson, Wesley W., 2008. "Estimation on stated-preference experiments constructed from revealed-preference choices," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 191-203, March.
    4. Datt, Gaurav & Ravallion, Martin, 1992. "Growth and redistribution components of changes in poverty measures : A decomposition with applications to Brazil and India in the 1980s," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 275-295, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ceriani,Lidia & Inchauste Comboni,Maria Gabriela & Olivieri,Sergio Daniel, 2015. "Understanding poverty reduction in Sri Lanka : evidence from 2002 to 2012/13," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7446, The World Bank.
    2. Facundo Alvaredo & Leonardo Gasparini, 2013. "Recent Trends in Inequality and Poverty in Developing Countries," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0151, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    3. Inchauste, Gabriela & Azevedo, João Pedro & Olivieri, Sergio & Saavedra, Jaime & Winkler, Hernan, 2012. "When Job Earnings Are behind Poverty Reduction," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 97, pages 1-6, November.
    4. S. R. Osmani & Abdul Latif, 2013. "The Pattern and Determinants of Poverty in Rural Bangladesh: 2000-2010," Working Papers 18, Institute of Microfinance (InM).
    5. Miguel Jaramillo, 2014. "The Incidence of Social Spending and Taxes in Peru," Public Finance Review, SAGE Publishing, vol. 42(3), pages 391-412, May.
    6. Irene Brambilla & Darío Tortarolo, 2015. "Growth in Labor Earnings Across the Income. Distribution: Latin America During the 2000s," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0182, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    7. Samuel Morley, 2017. "Changes in rural poverty in Perú 2004–2012," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 26(1), pages 1-20, December.
    8. Miguel Jaramillo Baanante, 2013. "The Incidence of Social Spending and Taxes in Peru," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 09, Tulane University, Department of Economics.

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