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Employability and skill set of newly graduated engineers in India

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  • Blom, Andreas
  • Saeki, Hiroshi

Abstract

Skill shortage remains one of the major constraints to continued growth of the Indian economy. This employer survey seeks to address this knowledge-gap by answering three questions: (i) Which skills do employers consider important when hiring new engineering graduates? (ii) How satisfied are employers with the skills of engineering graduates? and (iii) In which important skills are the engineers falling short? The results confirm a widespread dissatisfaction with the current graduates -- 64 percent of employers hiring fresh engineering graduates are only somewhat satisfied with the quality of the new hires or worse. After classifying all skills by factor analysis, the authors find that employers perceive Soft Skills (Core Employability Skills and Communication Skills) to be very important. Skill gaps are particularly severe in the higher-order thinking skills ranked according to Bloom's taxonomy. In contrast, communication in English has the smallest skill gap, but remains one of the most demanded skills by the employers. Although employers across India asks for the same set of soft skills, their skill demands differ for Professional Skills across economic sectors, company sizes, and regions. These findings suggest that engineering education institutions should: (i) seek to improve the skill set of graduates; (ii) recognize the importance of Soft Skills, (iii) refocus the assessments, teaching-learning process, and curricula away from lower-order thinking skills, such as remembering and understanding, toward higher-order skills, such as analyzing and solving engineering problems, as well as creativity; and (iv) interact more with employers to understand the particular demand for skills in that region and sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Blom, Andreas & Saeki, Hiroshi, 2011. "Employability and skill set of newly graduated engineers in India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5640, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5640
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mehtabul Azam & Aimee Chin & Nishith Prakash, 2013. "The Returns to English-Language Skills in India," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(2), pages 335-367.
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    Cited by:

    1. Atif Aziz & Faizuniah Pangil, 2017. "Moderating Effect of and Emotional Intelligence on the Relationship between Skills and Employability," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 7(3), pages 1-22, March.
    2. repec:eee:labeco:v:45:y:2017:i:c:p:116-130 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Maitra, Pushkar & Mani, Subha, 2017. "Learning and earning: Evidence from a randomized evaluation in India," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 116-130.
    4. Aedo, Cristian & Hentschel, Jesko & Luque, Javier & Moreno, Martin, 2013. "From occupations to embedded skills : a cross-country comparison," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6560, The World Bank.
    5. Cunningham, Wendy & Villasenor, Paula, 2014. "Employer voices, employer demands, and implications for public skills development policy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6853, The World Bank.
    6. Wendy V. Cunningham & Paula Villaseñor, 2016. "Employer Voices, Employer Demands, and Implications for Public Skills Development Policy Connecting the Labor and Education Sectors," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 31(1), pages 102-134.
    7. Majumder, Rajarshi, 2013. "Unemployment among educated youth: implications for India’s demographic dividend," MPRA Paper 46881, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Rita Almeida & Jere Behrman & David Robalino, 2012. "The Right Skills for the Job? Rethinking Training Policies for Workers," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13075, April.
    9. Prashant Mahajan & Suresh Golahit, 2017. "Are The Services Delivered Employable? A Scenario Of Technical Education In Rural India," Post-Print hal-01483640, HAL.
    10. Independent Evaluation Group, 2012. "Youth Employment Programs : An Evaluation of World Bank and International Finance Corporation Support," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 12225, April.
    11. Majumder, Rajarshi, 2013. "India’s demographic dividend: opportunities and threats," MPRA Paper 46880, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Ali Mehdi & Divya Chaudhry, 2016. "Human capital potential of India’s future workforce," Working Papers id:11079, eSocialSciences.
    13. Indermit Gill & Johannes Koettl & Truman Packard, 2013. "Full employment: a distant dream for Europe," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-34, December.
    14. Elena Y. Kardanova & Ekaterina S. Enchikova & Shi H & Johnson N. & Lydia O. Liu & Liyang Mao & Prashant Loyalka, 2015. "Constructing Tests that Can Measure and Compare the Maths and Physics Skills of Engineering Students in Russia and China," HSE Working papers WP BRP 28/EDU/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    15. Ali Mehdi & Divya Chaudhry, 2015. "Human Capital Potential of India's Future Workforce," Working Papers id:7846, eSocialSciences.

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    Keywords

    Teaching and Learning; ICT Policy and Strategies; Primary Education; Educational Sciences; Knowledge for Development;

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