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Energy access, efficiency, and poverty : how many households are energy poor in Bangladesh ?

Author

Listed:
  • Barnes, Douglas F.
  • Khandker, Shahidur R.
  • Samad, Hussain A.

Abstract

Access to energy, especially modern sources, is a key to any development initiative. Based on cross-section data from a 2004 survey of some 2,300 households in rural Bangladesh, this paper studies the welfare impacts of household energy use, including that of modern energy, and estimates the household minimum energy requirement that could be used as a basis for an energy poverty line. The paper finds that although the use of both traditional (biomass energy burned in conventional stoves) and modern (electricity and kerosene) sources improves household consumption and income, the return on modern sources is 20 to 25 times higher than that on traditional sources. In addition, after comparing alternate measures of the energy poverty line, the paper finds that some 58 percent of rural households in Bangladesh are energy poor, compared with 45 percent that are income poor. The findings suggest that growth in electrification and adoption of efficient cooking stoves for biomass use can lower energy poverty in a climate-friendly way by reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Reducing energy poverty helps reduce income poverty as well.

Suggested Citation

  • Barnes, Douglas F. & Khandker, Shahidur R. & Samad, Hussain A., 2010. "Energy access, efficiency, and poverty : how many households are energy poor in Bangladesh ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5332, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5332
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pradhan, Menno & Ravallion, Martin, 1998. "Measuring poverty using qualitative perceptions of welfare," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2011, The World Bank.
    2. Ravallion, Martin & Bidani, Benu, 1994. "How Robust Is a Poverty Profile?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 8(1), pages 75-102, January.
    3. Pokharel, Shaligram, 2004. "Energy economics of cooking in households in Nepal," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 547-559.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pachauri, Shonali & Spreng, Daniel, 2011. "Measuring and monitoring energy poverty," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 7497-7504.
    2. Takama, Takeshi & Tsephel, Stanzin & Johnson, Francis X., 2012. "Evaluating the relative strength of product-specific factors in fuel switching and stove choice decisions in Ethiopia. A discrete choice model of household preferences for clean cooking alternatives," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1763-1773.
    3. Khandker, Shahidur R. & Barnes, Douglas F. & Samad, Hussain A., 2010. "Energy poverty in rural and urban India : are the energy poor also income poor ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5463, The World Bank.
    4. Sovacool, Benjamin K. & Ryan, Sarah E., 2016. "The geography of energy and education: Leaders, laggards, and lessons for achieving primary and secondary school electrification," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 107-123.
    5. Sovacool, Benjamin K. & Drupady, Ira Martina, 2011. "Summoning earth and fire: The energy development implications of Grameen Shakti (GS) in Bangladesh," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 4445-4459.
    6. Fidelis O. Ogwumike & Uchechukwu M. Ozughalu & Gabriel A. Abiona, 2014. "Household Energy Use and Determinants: Evidence from Nigeria," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 4(2), pages 248-262.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy Production and Transportation; Energy and Environment; Environment and Energy Efficiency; Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases; Energy Demand;

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