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Disability, poverty, and schooling in developing countries : results from 11 household surveys

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  • Filmer, Deon

Abstract

This paper analyzes the relationship between whether a young person has a disability, the poverty status of their household, and their school participation using 11 household surveys from nine developing countries. Between 1 and 2 percent of the population is identified as having a disability. Youth with disabilities sometimes live in poorer households, but the extent of this concentration is typically neither large nor statistically significant. However, youth with disabilities are almost always substantially less likely to start school, and in some countries have lower transition rates resulting in lower schooling attainment. The order of magnitude of the school participation disability deficit is often larger than those associated with other characteristics such as gender, rural residence, or economic status differentials.

Suggested Citation

  • Filmer, Deon, 2005. "Disability, poverty, and schooling in developing countries : results from 11 household surveys," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3794, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3794
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Elwan, Ann, 1999. "Poverty and disability : a survey of the literature," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 21315, The World Bank.
    2. Paul Gertler & Jonathan Gruber, 2002. "Insuring Consumption Against Illness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 51-70, March.
    3. Margaret Grosh & Paul Glewwe, 2000. "Designing Household Survey Questionnaires for Developing Countries : Lessons from 15 Years of the Living Standards Measurement Study, Volume 3," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15195.
    4. Mohammad Afzal, 1992. "Disability Prevalence and Correlates in Pakistan: A Demographic Analysis," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 31(3), pages 217-258.
    5. Yeo, Rebecca & Moore, Karen, 2003. "Including Disabled People in Poverty Reduction Work: "Nothing About Us, Without Us"," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 571-590, March.
    6. Filmer, Deon*Pritchett, Lant, 1998. "Estimating wealth effects without expenditure data - or tears : with an application to educational enrollments in states of India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1994, The World Bank.
    7. Deon Filmer & Lant Pritchett, 1999. "The Effect of Household Wealth on Educational Attainment: Evidence from 35 Countries," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 25(1), pages 85-120.
    8. Hugo Benítez-Silva & Moshe Buchinsky & Hiu Man Chan & Sofia Cheidvasser & John Rust, 2004. "How large is the bias in self-reported disability?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(6), pages 649-670.
    9. Kathryn Yount & Emily Agree, 2005. "Differences in disability among older women and men in Egypt and Tunisia," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(1), pages 169-187, February.
    10. Asghar Zaidi & Tania Burchardt, 2005. "Comparing Incomes When Needs Differ: Equivalization For The Extra Costs Of Disability In The U.K," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 51(1), pages 89-114, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mirey Ovadiya & Giuseppe Zampaglione, 2009. "Escaping Stigma and Neglect : People with Disabilities in Sierra Leone," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 5950.
    2. Skeen, Sarah & Tomlinson, Mark & Macedo, Ana & Miltz, Ada & Croome, Natasha & Sherr, Lorraine, 2014. "Child development in HIV-positive and HIV-affected children in South Africa and Malawi—What role for community organisations?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 90-97.
    3. Deon Filmer & Kinnon Scott, 2012. "Assessing Asset Indices," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(1), pages 359-392, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Cohesion; Social Protections&Assistance; Gender and Law; Primary Education; Health Monitoring&Evaluation;

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