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Foreign technology imports and economic growth in developing countries

Author

Listed:
  • Xiaoming Zhang
  • Heng-fu Zou

Abstract

The authors investigate the relationship between foreign technology imports and economic growth in developing countries. They develop an intertemporal endogenous growth model that explicitly accepts foreign technology imports as a factor of production. The model establishes a link between the growth rate of productivity in a developing country and the country's intensity of learning to use foreign technologies. They hypothesize that a developing country's economic growth rate increases as foreign technology imports increase. They run regressions with data for about 50 developing countries, using different econometric methods and time spans. These empirical tests confirm the hypothesis that foreign technology transfers boost income growth rates. Moreover, economic developing in developing countries differs from that in industrial countries. In developing countries, increases in productivity depend not on innovation but on importing foreign plants and equipment and on borrowing foreign technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiaoming Zhang & Heng-fu Zou, 1995. "Foreign technology imports and economic growth in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1412, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:1412
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Bakari, Sayef, 2019. "Do Agricultural Raw Materials Imports Cause Agricultural Growth? Empirical Analysis from North Africa," Bulletin of Economic Theory and Analysis, BETA Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 65-77, December.
    2. Ludger Lindlar, 1995. "Internationale Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der südostasiatischen Schwellen- und Entwicklungsländer," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 64(2), pages 303-322.
    3. Rout, Ullash K. & Fahl, Ulrich & Remme, Uwe & Blesl, Markus & Voß, Alfred, 2009. "Endogenous implementation of technology gap in energy optimization models--a systematic analysis within TIMES G5 model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(7), pages 2814-2830, July.

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