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The nuts and bolts of designing and implementing training programs in developing countries

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  • Honorati, Maddalena
  • McArdle, Thomas P

Abstract

Training programs mainly address market failures related to lack of skills (technical, cognitive, non-cognitive). This paper conducts a comprehensive review of training programs effectiveness in developing countries. Based on relevant international experiences, the paper highlights key design features associated with program success as well as implementation challenges and discusses their policy implication. Success of training programs is deeply related with the content of the skills provided and how well they serve the local labor demand (demand-driven design) and with the presence of a sound governance structure for training providers and beneficiaries. In particular, the effectiveness of training programs for youth tends to be higher when a'comprehensive'approach is taken by combining different types of training with complementary support services. The ultimate goal is to inform new program design and improve the performance of current training programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Honorati, Maddalena & McArdle, Thomas P, 2013. "The nuts and bolts of designing and implementing training programs in developing countries," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 78980, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:hdnspu:78980
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    2. Premand, Patrick & Brodmann, Stefanie & Almeida, Rita & Grun, Rebekka & Barouni, Mahdi, 2016. "Entrepreneurship Education and Entry into Self-Employment Among University Graduates," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 311-327.
    3. Pablo Ibarraran & Laura Ripani & Bibiana Taboada & Juan Villa & Brigida Garcia, 2014. "Life skills, employability and training for disadvantaged youth: Evidence from a randomized evaluation design," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-24, December.
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    5. Cho, Yoonyoung & Honorati, Maddalena, 2014. "Entrepreneurship programs in developing countries: A meta regression analysis," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 110-130.
    6. Erica Field & Seema Jayachandran & Rohini Pande, 2010. "Do Traditional Institutions Constrain Female Entrepreneurship? A Field Experiment on Business Training in India," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 125-129, May.
    7. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Shawn Cole & Esther Duflo & Leigh Linden, 2007. "Remedying Education: Evidence from Two Randomized Experiments in India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1235-1264.
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    Cited by:

    1. Umapathi, Nithin & Wang, Dewen & O'Keefe, Philip, 2013. "Eligibility thresholds for minimum living guarantee programs : international practices and implications for China," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 83118, The World Bank.
    2. Domelen, Julie van, 2012. "Togo : towards a national social protection policy and strategy," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 89000, The World Bank.
    3. Pablo Lavado & Jamele Rigolini & Gustavo Yamada, 2015. "Giving Peru a productivity boost : towards a system of continuous education and training," Working Papers 15-16, Centro de Investigación, Universidad del Pacífico.
    4. Cerutti, Paula & Fruttero, Anna & Grosh, Margaret & Kostenbaum, Silvana & Oliveri, Maria Laura & Rodriguez-Alas, Claudia & Strokova, Victoria, 2014. "Social assistance and labor market programs in Latin America : methodology and key findings from the social protection database," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 88769, The World Bank.
    5. Robalino, David & Margolis, David & Rother, Friederike & Newhouse, David & Lundberg, Mattias, 2013. "Youth employment : a human development agenda for the next decade," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 83925, The World Bank.
    6. Ana Luna & Miguel Nuñez-del-Prado & Jose Luján & Luis Mantilla García & Daniel Malca, 2017. "Alternative setup for estimating reliable frequency values in a ripple tank," Working Papers 17-01, Centro de Investigación, Universidad del Pacífico.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Primary Education; Education For All; Access&Equity in Basic Education; ICT Policy and Strategies; Teaching and Learning;

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