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Synthetic ‘Real Socialism’: A Counterfactual Analysis of Political and Economic Liberalizations

Author

Listed:
  • Ilaria Petrarca

    () (Department of Economics (University of Verona))

  • Roberto Ricciuti

    () (Department of Economics (University of Verona))

Abstract

We evaluate the effect of the 1989 shock over economic development in four Eastern European countries. We apply a counterfactual approach and define the shock alternatively as the trigger for economic openness, political competition, or both. The main result is an effect of economic freedom large than the one of democratization. In Poland and Bulgaria we find a positive impact of economic freedom, while in Bulgaria there is also a smaller effect of democratization. In Albania, after an initial recession, economic freedom helps recovery. Finally, Romania does not show any robust effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Ilaria Petrarca & Roberto Ricciuti, 2014. "Synthetic ‘Real Socialism’: A Counterfactual Analysis of Political and Economic Liberalizations," Working Papers 11/2014, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ver:wpaper:11/2014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    economics of transition; synthetic control estimator; democratization; economic freedom.;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • P27 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Performance and Prospects

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