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(Successful) Democracies Breed Their Own Support

Author

Listed:
  • Acemoglu, Daron

    (MIT)

  • Ajzenman, Nicolas

    (McGill University)

  • Aksoy, Cevat Giray

    (European Bank for Reconstruction and Development)

  • Fiszbein, Martin

    (Boston University)

  • Molina, Carlos

    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Abstract

Using large-scale survey data covering more than 110 countries and exploiting within-country variation across cohorts and surveys, we show that individuals with longer exposure to democracy display stronger support for democratic institutions. We bolster these baseline findings using an instrumental-variables strategy exploiting regional democratization waves and focusing on immigrants' exposure to democracy before migration. In all cases, the timing and nature of the effects are consistent with a causal interpretation. We also establish that democracies breed their own support only when they are successful: all of the effects we estimate work through exposure to democracies that are successful in providing economic growth, peace and political stability, and public goods.

Suggested Citation

  • Acemoglu, Daron & Ajzenman, Nicolas & Aksoy, Cevat Giray & Fiszbein, Martin & Molina, Carlos, 2021. "(Successful) Democracies Breed Their Own Support," IZA Discussion Papers 14691, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp14691
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Kotschy, Rainer & Sunde, Uwe, 2022. "Does Demography Determine Democratic Attitudes?," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 338, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    3. Ritzen, Jo & Nillesen, Eleonora, 2022. "A chance for optimism," MERIT Working Papers 2022-026, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    4. Mensah,Justice Tei & Hirfrfot,Kibrom Tafere & Abay,Kibrom A., 2022. "Saving Lives through Technology : Mobile Phones and Infant Mortality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9978, The World Bank.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    democracy; economic growth; institutions; support for democracy; values;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism

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