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Incentives and Institutions. A Bottom-up Approach to Climate Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Carlo Carraro

    () (Department of Economics, University Of Venice Ca� Foscari)

Abstract

This paper comments and assesses �Fragmented Carbon Markets and Reluctant Nations: Implications for the Design of Effective Architectures�, a paper that David Victor presented at the international workshop on "Architectures for Agreement: Addressing Global Climate Change in the Post-Kyoto World", organized by Joe Aldy and Rob Stavins at the J.F. Kennedy School of Government in May 2006. By analyzing Victor�s proposals for an effective climate agreement post 2012, this paper emphasizes the contribution that game-theoretical analyses have provided to the design of climate agreements. It therefore emphasizes how incentives and institutions play a crucial role in affecting the final outcome of negotiations on climate change control, and how incentives and institutions can be modified to achieve a better control of climate change. This paper also discusses a wider policy approach that can enhance the effectiveness of measures designed to address the climate change problem.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlo Carraro, 2006. "Incentives and Institutions. A Bottom-up Approach to Climate Policy," Working Papers 2006_49, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  • Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2006_49
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ray, Debraj & Vohra, Rajiv, 1997. "Equilibrium Binding Agreements," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 30-78, March.
    2. Carlo Carraro (ed.), 2003. "The Endogenous Formation of Economic Coalitions," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2999, April.
    3. Casella, Alessandra, 1996. "Large countries, small countries and the enlargement of trade blocs," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 389-415, February.
    4. Gabrielle Demange & Wooders Myrna, 2005. "Group Formation in Economics: Networks, Clubs and Coalitions," Post-Print halshs-00576778, HAL.
    5. BLOCH, Francis & FERRER, Hélène, 1999. "Trade fragmentation and coordination in bilateral oligopolies," CORE Discussion Papers 1999008, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    6. Richard Baldwin, 1993. "A Domino Theory of Regionalism," NBER Working Papers 4465, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Robert Reinstein, 2004. "A Possible Way Forward on Climate Change," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 245-309, July.
    8. Carraro, Carlo & Siniscalco, Domenico, 1993. "Strategies for the international protection of the environment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 309-328, October.
    9. Sang-Seung Yi, 1996. "Open Regionalism and World Welfare," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 22(4), pages 467-475, Fall.
    10. Yi, Sang-Seung, 1997. "Stable Coalition Structures with Externalities," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 201-237, August.
    11. Carraro, Carlo & Siniscalco, Domenico, 1998. "International Institutions and Environmental Policy: International environmental agreements: Incentives and political economy1," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-5), pages 561-572, May.
    12. Bond, Eric W. & Syropoulos, Constantinos, 1996. "The size of trading blocs Market power and world welfare effects," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-4), pages 411-437, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agreements; Climate; Incentives; Negotiations; Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy

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