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Growth Shocks and Portfolio Flows

  • Eylem Ersal Kiziler

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater)

This paper studies the cyclicality of portfolio flows under the presence of productivity growth rate shocks. Productivity growth rate shocks successfully replicate countercyclical net equity outflows and procyclical bond inflows for advanced countries, which couldn't be captured in a model with only level shocks. Similarly, for an emerging market economy, the model with growth rate shocks generates countercyclical net equity inflows and procyclical bond inflows in accordance with data. Following a growth rate shock, home agents experience a decrease both in equity inflows and outflows on impact. Inflows decrease due to sales of home equity to realize capital gains and outflows decrease due to initial dissaving to finance increases in consumption and investment. Equity inflows increase later, as home dividends rise. Equity outflows pick up also as wealthier home agents increase purchases of foreign assets to hedge against home productivity shocks.

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File URL: http://www.uww.edu/documents/colleges/cobe/economics/wpapers/11_02_Ersal-Kiziler.pdf
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Paper provided by UW-Whitewater, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 11-02.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: May 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uww:wpaper:11-02
Contact details of provider: Postal: Whitewater, WI 53190-1750
Phone: (414) 472-1361
Web page: http://www.uww.edu/cobe/economics/main.html
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  1. Alan Sutherland & Michael B Devereux, 2007. "Country Portfolio Dynamics," 2007 Meeting Papers 386, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Michael B. Devereux & Alan Sutherland, 2008. "Country portfolios in open economy macro models," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 09, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  3. Nicolas Coeurdacier & Robert Kollmann & Philippe Martin, 2009. "International portfolios, capital accumulation and foreign assets dynamics," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 27, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  4. Nguyen, Ha, 2011. "Valuation effects with transitory and trend productivity shocks," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 245-255.
  5. Rochelle M. Edge & Thomas Laubach & John C. Williams, 2004. "Learning and shifts in long-run productivity growth," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-21, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  6. Martin D. D. Evans & Viktoria Hnatkovska, 2005. "International Capital Flows, Returns and World Financial Integration," NBER Working Papers 11701, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Schmitt-Grohe, Stephanie & Uribe, Martin, 2003. "Closing small open economy models," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 163-185, October.
  8. Devereux, Michael B. & Sutherland, Alan, 2009. "A portfolio model of capital flows to emerging markets," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 181-193, July.
  9. Reinhart, Carmen & Kaminsky, Graciela & Vegh, Carlos, 2004. "When it rains, it pours: Procyclical capital flows and macroeconomic policies," MPRA Paper 13883, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Mark Aguiar & Gita Gopinath, 2004. "Emerging Market Business Cycles: The Cycle is the Trend," NBER Working Papers 10734, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Cedric Tille & Eric van Wincoop, 2007. "International Capital Flows," Working Papers 122007, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  12. Pietro Cova & Massimiliano Pisani & Nicoletta Batini & Alessandro Rebucci, 2008. "Productivity and Global Imbalances: The Role of Nontradable Total Factor Productivity in Advanced Economies," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 55(2), pages 312-325, June.
  13. Aguiar, Mark & Gopinath, Gita, 2007. "Emerging Market Business Cycles: The Cycle is the Trend," Scholarly Articles 11988098, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  14. Contessi, Silvio & De Pace, Pierangelo & Francis, Johanna L., 2013. "The cyclical properties of disaggregated capital flows," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 528-555.
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