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Metrics Capturing the Degree to Which Individual Economies Are Globalized

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We discuss metrics of globalization for individual economies as distance measures between fully integrated and trade restricted equilibria in economies initially operating under less than full integration with the global economy. Such metrics can be used to construct country globalization metrics reflecting the distance of economies from full global integration due to trade barriers, barriers to factor flows, barriers to international financial intermediation, solved technological diffusion and other economy specific features yielding less than full integration into the global economy. Many distance metrics present themselves and none are wholly satisfactory since they each behave differently across various displacements from integration. Distance measures can, for instance, be small in goods space but large in price space. We present alternative measures constructed for eight OECD economies and comment in a concluding section on other measures used elsewhere in the literature such as trade / GDP ratios.

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  • Raymond Riezman & John Whalley & Shunming Zhang, 2008. "Metrics Capturing the Degree to Which Individual Economies Are Globalized," University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute Working Papers 20085, University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwo:epuwoc:20085
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    1. Mas-Colell,Andreu, 1990. "The Theory of General Economic Equilibrium," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521388702, November.
    2. John Whalley, 2008. "Globalisation and Values," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(11), pages 1503-1524, November.
    3. Hamilton, Bob & Whalley, John, 1984. "Efficiency and distributional implications of global restrictions on labour mobility : Calculations and policy implications," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 61-75.
    4. Douglas A. Irwin, 2001. "Tariffs and Growth in Late Nineteenth Century America," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(1), pages 15-30, January.
    5. Shoven,John B. & Whalley,John, 1992. "Applying General Equilibrium," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521266550, December.
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    1. Riezman, Raymond & Whalley, John & Zhang, Shunming, 2011. "Distance measures between free trade and autarky for the world economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 2000-2012, July.
    2. Martin Gonzalez Eiras & Dirk Niepelt, 2004. "Sustaining Social Security," Working Papers 72, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Jun 2004.
    3. Irena Mikolajun & Jean-Marie Viaene, 2015. "Trade, Factor Mobility and the Extent of Economic Integration: Theory and Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 5481, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Irena Mikolajun & Jean-Marie Viaene, 2015. "Trade, Factor Mobility and the Extent of Economic Integration: Theory and Evidence," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-096/VI, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Bouët, Antoine & Cosnard, Lionel & Laborde Debucquet, David, 2017. "Measuring trade integration in Africa," IFPRI discussion papers 1667, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Harry Bowen & Haris Munandar & Jean-Marie Viaene, 2010. "How integrated is the world economy?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 146(3), pages 389-414, September.

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