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The International Volatility of Growth


  • Alaistar Chan

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

  • Kenneth W. Clements

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)


Growth in the world economy is not shared equally among all countries, with some growing faster, some slower and some not at all. The cross-country distribution of growth is a useful tool for analysing the inequality of growth. The appropriately-weighted first moment of this distribution is world growth, while the second measures cross-country volatility. This paper introduces a methodology to examine the cross-country distribution of growth, and the components of its volatility. Using data from the Penn World Table, we find countries within geographic regions are seeing a harmonisation of growth, but between regions there is increasing dispersion.

Suggested Citation

  • Alaistar Chan & Kenneth W. Clements, 2007. "The International Volatility of Growth," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 07-10, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:07-10

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mirman, Leonard J, 1971. "Uncertainty and Optimal Consumption Decisions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(1), pages 179-185, January.
    2. Clements, Kenneth W. & Nguyen, Phuong, 1982. "Inflation and relative prices : A decomposition analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 257-262.
    3. Ramey, Garey & Ramey, Valerie A, 1995. "Cross-Country Evidence on the Link between Volatility and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1138-1151, December.
    4. Pindyck, Robert S, 1991. "Irreversibility, Uncertainty, and Investment," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 1110-1148, September.
    5. Ben S. Bernanke, 1983. "Irreversibility, Uncertainty, and Cyclical Investment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 98(1), pages 85-106.
    6. Tang, Sam Hak Kan, 2002. "The link between growth volatility and technical progress: cross-country evidence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 77(3), pages 335-341, November.
    7. Diewert, W. E., 1976. "Exact and superlative index numbers," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 115-145, May.
    8. Kormendi, Roger C. & Meguire, Philip G., 1985. "Macroeconomic determinants of growth: Cross-country evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 141-163, September.
    9. Garey Ramey & Valerie A. Ramey, 1991. "Technology Commitment and the Cost of Economic Fluctuations," NBER Working Papers 3755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Mei-Hsiu, 2010. "Understanding world metals prices--Returns, volatility and diversification," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 127-140, September.

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    Growth; Cross-Country Distribution; Volatility;

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