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Student Outcomes at University in Autsralia: A Quantile Regression Approach

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  • Elisa Rose Birch

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Western Australia)

  • Paul W. Miller

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Western Australia)

Abstract

Students’ success during their first year at university is largely influenced by their university entrance score. Personal characteristics and secondary school characteristics also impact on success. This paper uses quantile regression to investigate how the effects of these factors vary along the grade distribution. It finds that the factors which influence grades have a more pronounced impact on the success of low-achieving students than on that of high-achieving students. These results have implications for student selection and also for the way scholarships may be used to attract talented high school students.

Suggested Citation

  • Elisa Rose Birch & Paul W. Miller, 2005. "Student Outcomes at University in Autsralia: A Quantile Regression Approach," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 05-26, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:05-26
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    File URL: http://www.business.uwa.edu.au/school/economics/2005/?a=99953
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fertig, Michael, 2003. "Who's to Blame? The Determinants of German Students' Achievement in the PISA 2000 Study," RWI Discussion Papers 4, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
    2. Fertig, Michael, 2003. "Who's to Blame? The Determinants of German Students' Achievement in the PISA 2000 Study," IZA Discussion Papers 739, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Nicole Schneeweis & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2007. "Peer effects in Austrian schools," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 387-409, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Girijasankar Mallik & John Lodewijks, 2010. "Student Performance in a Large First Year Economics Subject: Which Variables are Significant?," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 29(1), pages 80-86, March.
    2. Grace Chia & Paul W. Miller, 2008. "Tertiary Performance, Field of Study and Graduate Starting Salaries," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 41(1), pages 15-31, March.
    3. Buly A. Cardak & Joe Vecci, 2016. "Graduates, Dropouts and Slow Finishers: The Effects of Credit Constraints on University Outcomes," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(3), pages 323-346, June.
    4. Juliana Guimarães & Breno Sampaio, 2007. "The Influence Of Family Background And Individual Characteristics On Entrance Tests Scores Of Brazilian University Students," Anais do XXXV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 35th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 092, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    5. Mallik, Girijasankar & Shankar, Sriram, 2016. "Does prior knowledge of economics and higher level mathematics improve student learning in principles of economics?," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 66-73.
    6. Juliana Guimarães & Breno Sampaio, 2008. "Mind the Gap: Evidences from Gender Differences in Scores in Brazil," Anais do XXXVI Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 36th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 200807211527140, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].

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