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Deposit Withdrawals from Distressed Commercial Banks: The Importance of Switching Costs

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  • Brown, Martin

    ()

  • Guin, Benjamin

    ()

  • Morkoetter, Stefan

    ()

Abstract

We study retail deposit withdrawals from commercial banks which were differentially exposed to distress during the 2007-2009 financial crisis. We show that the propensity of households to withdraw deposits increases with the severity of bank distress. Withdrawal risk is, however, substantially mitigated by strong bank-client relationships. Considering the most distressed bank in our sample, 23 percent of its clients shifted deposits away from the bank during the crisis. Our estimates suggest that this withdrawal risk is eliminated if a client banked exclusively with this financial institution before the crisis, and is more than halved if the client had a mortgage with this bank. Our findings provide empirical support to the Basel III liquidity regulations which emphasize the role of well-established client relationships for the stability of bank funding.

Suggested Citation

  • Brown, Martin & Guin, Benjamin & Morkoetter, Stefan, 2013. "Deposit Withdrawals from Distressed Commercial Banks: The Importance of Switching Costs," Working Papers on Finance 1319, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance, revised Dec 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:usg:sfwpfi:2013:19
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    File URL: http://ux-tauri.unisg.ch/RePEc/usg/sfwpfi/WPF-1319.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lambert, Claudia & Noth, Felix & Schüwer, Ulrich, 2017. "How do insured deposits affect bank risk? Evidence from the 2008 Emergency Economic Stabilization Act," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 81-102.
    2. Maaike Diepstraten & Carin van der Cruijsen, 2017. "To stay or go? Consumer bank switching behaviour after government interventions," DNB Working Papers 550, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    3. Brown, Martin & Henchoz, Caroline & Spycher, Thomas, 2017. "Culture and Financial Literacy," Working Papers on Finance 1703, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    4. Kristian Blickle, 2017. "Local Banks, Credit Supply, and House Prices," Working Papers on Finance 1811, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    5. Marianna Brunetti & Rocco Ciciretti & Ljubica Djordjevic, 2016. "Till Mortgage Do Us Part: Refinancing Costs and Household’s Bank Switching," CEIS Research Paper 364, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 13 Dec 2017.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Liquidity Risk; Relationship Banking; Market Discipline;

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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