IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/upf/upfgen/354.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Lyfe-cycle effects on household expenditures: A latent-variable approach

Author

Abstract

Using data from the Spanish household budget survey, we investigate life- cycle effects on several product expenditures. A latent-variable model approach is adopted to evaluate the impact of income on expenditures, controlling for the number of members in the family. Two latent factors underlying repeated measures of monetary and non-monetary income are used as explanatory variables in the expenditure regression equations, thus avoiding possible bias associated to the measurement error in income. The proposed methodology also takes care of the case in which product expenditures exhibit a pattern of infrequent purchases. Multiple-group analysis is used to assess the variation of key parameters of the model across various household life-cycle typologies. The analysis discloses significant life-cycle effects on the mean levels of expenditures; it also detects significant life-cycle effects on the way expenditures are affected by income and family size. Asymptotic robust methods are used to account for possible non-normality of the data.

Suggested Citation

  • Eva Ventura & Albert Satorra, 1998. "Lyfe-cycle effects on household expenditures: A latent-variable approach," Economics Working Papers 354, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  • Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:354
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://econ-papers.upf.edu/papers/354.pdf
    File Function: Whole Paper
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Punj, Girish N & Staelin, Richard, 1983. " A Model of Consumer Information Search Behavior for New Automobiles," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(4), pages 366-380, March.
    2. Robert Summers, 1957. "A Note on Least Squares Bias in Household Expenditure Analysis," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 29, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    3. Biorn, Erik, 1992. "The Bias of Some Estimators for Panel Data Models with Measurement Errors," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 51-66.
    4. Albert Satorra, 1991. "Asymptotic robust inferences in the analysis of mean and covariance structures," Economics Working Papers 3, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    5. Schaninger, Charles M & Danko, William D, 1993. " A Conceptual and Empirical Comparison of Alternative Household Life Cycle Models," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(4), pages 580-594, March.
    6. Satorra, Albert & Neudecker, Heinz, 1994. "On the Asymptotic Optimality of Alternative Minimum-Distance Estimators in Linear Latent-Variable Models," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(05), pages 867-883, December.
    7. Aasness, Jorgen & Biorn, Erik & Skjerpen, Terje, 1993. "Engel Functions, Panel Data, and Latent Variables," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(6), pages 1395-1422, November.
    8. Jørgen Aasness & Erik Biørn & Terje Skjerpen, 2003. "Distribution of preferences and measurement errors in a disaggregated expenditure system," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 6(2), pages 374-400, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gülay Günay & Ayfer Boylu & Özgün Bener, 2014. "An Examination of Factors Affecting Economic Status and Finances Satisfaction of Families: A Comparison of Metropolitan and Rural Areas," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 119(1), pages 211-245, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Structural equations; multi-group analysis; life cycle effects; product expenditures;

    JEL classification:

    • M31 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising - - - Marketing
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:354. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://www.econ.upf.edu/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.