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Organizational Innovations of Firms from the 1850s in the USA and Japan

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Abstract

Organizational Innovations (OIs) are defined as disembodied technology as against embodied technology or technical (technological) innovations. The firms, as we see them today in the USA, Japan and many other countries, are organized according to OIs that took place in the USA and Japan in the last 150 years or so. A historical review during that period will identify OIs in these two countries. OIs such as integration of production and distribution, focal factories, and just-in-time cum quality control (JIT/QC) are more thoroughly described.

Suggested Citation

  • Sanidas, E., 2002. "Organizational Innovations of Firms from the 1850s in the USA and Japan," Economics Working Papers wp02-06, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:uow:depec1:wp02-06
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    File URL: http://www.uow.edu.au/content/groups/public/@web/@commerce/@econ/documents/doc/uow012124.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Baldwin, Carliss Y. & Clark, Kim B., 1994. "Capital-Budgeting Systems and Capabilities Investments in U.S. Companies after the Second World War," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 68(01), pages 73-109, March.
    2. Litterer, Joseph A., 1961. "Systematic Management: The Search for Order and Integration," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 35(04), pages 461-476, December.
    3. Langlois, Richard N. & Robertson, Paul L., 1989. "Explaining Vertical Integration: Lessons from the American Automobile Industry," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(02), pages 361-375, June.
    4. Litterer, Joseph A., 1963. "Systematic Management: Design for Organizational Recoupling in American Manufacturing Firms," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 37(04), pages 369-391, December.
    5. Sanidas, E., 2001. "The Successful Imitation of the Japanese Lean Production System by American Firms: Impact on American Economic Growth," Economics Working Papers wp01-02, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sanidas, Elias, 2002. "Leading Manufacturing Sectors in the USA and Japan During 1899-1937 and Organizational Innovations: Embeddedness for Corporate Strategy," Economics Working Papers wp02-20, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

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    Keywords

    organizational innovations; disembodied technology; firms; economic growth; historical review;

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