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Systematic Management: Design for Organizational Recoupling in American Manufacturing Firms

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  • Litterer, Joseph A.

Abstract

In developing techniques and guides for many of the regular or routine activities of managers, the Systematic Management movement of the late nineteenth century performed an important service for American business. The movement's response to breakdowns in the internal co-ordination of manufacturing firms was especially significant and forms the basis for Professor Litterer's analysis of the relevant literature.

Suggested Citation

  • Litterer, Joseph A., 1963. "Systematic Management: Design for Organizational Recoupling in American Manufacturing Firms," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 37(04), pages 369-391, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:buhirw:v:37:y:1963:i:04:p:369-391_01
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    Cited by:

    1. Marcelo Bucheli & Joseph T. Mahoney & Paul M. Vaaler, 2010. "Chandler's Living History: "The Visible Hand" of Vertical Integration in Nineteenth Century America Viewed Under a Twenty-First Century Transaction Costs Economics Lens," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(s1), pages 859-883, July.
    2. Andreas Reinstaller & Werner Hölzl, 2001. "The creative response in economic development: the case of information processing technologies in US manufacturing, 1870-1930," Working Papers geewp15, Vienna University of Economics and Business Research Group: Growth and Employment in Europe: Sustainability and Competitiveness.
    3. Andreas Reinstaller & Werner Hölzl, 2004. "Complementarity constraints and induced innovation: some evidence from the first IT regime," Chapters,in: Applied Evolutionary Economics and Complex Systems, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Reinstaller, Andreas & Holzl, Werner, 2001. "The Technological Bias in the Establishment of a Technological Regime: the adoption and enforcement of early information processing technologies in US manufacturing, 1870-1930," Research Memorandum 013, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    5. Sanidas, E., 2002. "Organizational Innovations of Firms from the 1850s in the USA and Japan," Economics Working Papers wp02-06, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    6. Hölzl, Werner & Reinstaller, Andreas, 2003. "The Babbage principle after evolutionary economics," Research Memorandum 016, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    7. Werner Hölzl & Andreas Reinstaller, 2000. "The Adoption and Enforcement of a Technological Regime: The Case of the first IT Regime," Working Papers geewp12, Vienna University of Economics and Business Research Group: Growth and Employment in Europe: Sustainability and Competitiveness.

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