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Technology Trends in Pollution-Intensive Industries: A Review of Sectoral Trends

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  • Bartzokas, Anthony

    ()

  • Yarime, Masaru

    () (United Nations University, Institute for New Technologies)

Abstract

This paper provides some background information on the technological trends in seven pollution-intensive industrial sectors (i.e. pulp and paper, organic chemical, inorganic chemical, iron and steel, petroleum refining, fertilizer, and textile industries) with a particular emphasis on the introduction of cleaner technologies. In most of the industrial branches examined in this review, the introduction of end-of-pipe technologies is widely found. However, it seems that cleaner technologies have not yet been fully utilized in various industrial sectors. The extent to which cleaner technologies are adopted is limited mostly in cases where reuse and recycling of energy, water, and raw materials can contribute to a reduction of production costs. With some exceptions, process-integrated modifications involving chemical reactions have not yet been realized. In order to achieve drastic reduction in emissions, more fundamental changes will be necessary in the production process and/or the composition of final products. Furthermore, with the application of end-of-pipe technologies the benefits of raw material and energy savings will not occur, and technological spillovers to the main production process will be limited. That is, innovation offsets will be difficult to obtain. Eventually, firms would need to develop cleaner technologies by introducing an integrated assessment of their production processes and products.

Suggested Citation

  • Bartzokas, Anthony & Yarime, Masaru, 1997. "Technology Trends in Pollution-Intensive Industries: A Review of Sectoral Trends," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 06, United Nations University - INTECH.
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unuint:199706
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    File URL: http://www.intech.unu.edu/publications/discussion-papers/9706.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kevin P. Gallagher, "undated". "01-08 "Is NACEC a Model Trade and Environment Institution? Lessons from Mexican Industry"," GDAE Working Papers 01-08, GDAE, Tufts University.
    2. Mani, Sunil, 2000. "Exports of High Technology Products from Developing Countries: Is it Real or a Statistical Artifact?," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 1, United Nations University - INTECH.
    3. Mohan Babu, G.N., 1999. "The Determinants of Firm-level Technological Performances - A Study on the Indian Capital Goods Sector," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 01, United Nations University - INTECH.
    4. Bastos, Maria-Ines & Steinmueller, Edward, 1995. "Information and Communication Technologies: Growth, Competitiveness, and Policy for Developing Nations," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 11, United Nations University - INTECH.
    5. John Olatunji ADEOTI, 2001. "Technology Investment In Pollution Control In Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence From Nigerian Manufacturing," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 39(4), pages 395-431, December.
    6. Cooper, Charles, 1995. "Technological Change and Dual Economies," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 10, United Nations University - INTECH.
    7. Gu, Shulin, 1999. "Implications Of National Innovation Systems For Developing Countries: Managing Change And Complexity In Economic Development," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 03, United Nations University - INTECH.

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    Keywords

    Pollution Sources; Industry; Environmental Policy; New Technology;

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